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  • Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
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    1. Back To Top    #21
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      Quote Originally Posted by eyexer View Post
      No. They made Lake Erie he fishery it is today
      Erie was one of the most contaminated bodies of water out there due to industrial pollution. PCBs and many other things had the fishery in a hole during the second half of the 20th century. Do we have those problems here in ND to where they will provide a similar benefit?

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      Last edited by Allen; 07-10-2020 at 12:21 PM.
      "Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress; but I repeat myself." Mark Twain, speaking on Congress.

    2. Back To Top    #22
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      Quote Originally Posted by Allen View Post
      Erie was one of the most contaminated bodies of water out there due to industrial pollution, PCBs and many other things had the fishery in a hole during the second half of the 20th century. Do we have those problems here in ND to where they will provide a similar benefit?
      actually, yes we do - nutrient load is horrific

      wonder what effect ZMs might have on that issue?

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      If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there'd be a shortage of fishing poles.
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    3. Back To Top    #23
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      Quote Originally Posted by rodcontrol View Post
      Besides being a hindrance on water pipes and other manmade structures have they caused any catastrophic damage to any system yet? Serious question.

      Zebra Mussels


      Audrey Rabalais | Fondriest Environmental
      Zebra Mussel
      Scientific name: Dreissena polymorpha
      Common name: Zebra mussel

      Countries of origin: Southeast Russia, near the Black and Caspian Seas.
      Invasion areas: Great Britain, The Netherlands, Czech Republic, Sweden, Italy, United States Great Lakes, Nevada, California, Louisiana and throughout the Midwest.
      Zebra Mussel Distribution
      Zebra mussel facts

      • Introduced to the United States in about 1986, the zebra mussel is thought to have hitched rides through ballast water in the bottom of ships traveling from Europe to the United States.
      • They are named for the striped pattern on many of their shells.
      • These destructive mussels are typically only the size of a fingernail and grow to a maximum length of two inches.
      • They are often spread locally by attaching to smaller recreational boats that are not properly cleaned
      • Zebra mussels can survive 3 to 5 days out of water

      The problem with zebra mussels

      Like typical invasive species, because zebra mussels have no natural predators, they outcompete native species for resources. Zebra mussels also can kill native U.S. mussels by attaching to their shells. Because the mussels are so populous, they often coat the bottom of lakes and rivers where aquatic insects normally burrow and forage. This has caused a sharp drop in native aquatic insect populations and those animals that feed on them (e.g., many fish) in some places, zebra mussels have intentionally been introduced because they can increase water clarity and transparency. By filtering large volumes of water, the mussels reduce the amount of algae in the water, resulting in clearer water. However, this efficient filtering reduces food resources (e.g., zooplankton) which reduce the number and health of fish. Additionally, because the mussels filter very effectively, they can concentrate toxins found in the water. When animals such as birds eat these contaminated mussels, they can die.
      In addition to competing with other aquatic species for space and food, zebra mussels also create huge problems for water and lake managers. The mussels are renowned for their ability to latch onto poles, buoys, boats, beaches and all other equipment near the water in mass numbers. They clog water pipes and screens and can cause engines to overheat. They are also a danger to water recreationalists who can cut themselves on sharp shells.
      Control efforts

      Perhaps the most effective control of preventing the introduction of more zebra mussels is the ballast exchange program, often called the “swish and spit” method. Since 2006, U.S. and Canadian governments have required that ships flush out their ballast tanks with saltwater while out at sea. The saltwater is toxic to freshwater zebra mussels. This ballast water exchange program is believed to reduce the chances of further invasions. For example, as a result of the current program, it was reported in April 2012 that no new confirmed invasive species have entered the Great Lakes since 2006.
      Other control measures include chemicals specific to zebra mussels that either kill adult species or prevent spawning and using low frequency magnetism to interrupt ions that would help form their shells.
      Many areas infested with zebra mussels post signs asking recreational boaters to clean their boats thoroughly before leaving to prevent spreading them. Because the mussels can survive for days outside the water, boaters are believed to be the most common mechanism by which the mussels colonize new lakes and waterways.
      Sources:

      1. http://www.ener-tec.com/OurProductLi...9/Default.aspx
      2. http://cisr.ucr.edu/quagga_zebra_mussels.html
      3. http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2012/04/15/lake-superior-invasive-species/



      - - - Updated - - -

      Quote Originally Posted by guywhofishes View Post
      actually, yes we do - nutrient load is horrific

      wonder what effect ZMs might have on that issue?
      While they would probably help lock up some of the phosphorus and nitrogen in our lakes that help them green up in the summer, I am not sure the lower productivity in zooplankton that so many species (minnows, walleye, perch, pike, etc) depend on for food in their early life stages is a good trade-off.

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      "Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress; but I repeat myself." Mark Twain, speaking on Congress.

    4. Back To Top    #24
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      Quote Originally Posted by Allen View Post
      If they are in Lake LaMoure, that means they are in the James River. Once in the James, they now have a clear path to about half of the Missouri River.
      Allen, the Missouri River already has them below Gavin's Point Dam, and some have been found above the damn in Lewis and Clark Lake last year.

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    5. Back To Top    #25
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      Hah, now that you mention it I remember they are already in the Missouri of SD.

      I guess, never mind. No harm done then.

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      "Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress; but I repeat myself." Mark Twain, speaking on Congress.

    6. Back To Top    #26
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      They have been the most over rated thing to hit the water

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    7. Back To Top    #27
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      Quote Originally Posted by eyexer View Post
      They have been the most over rated thing to hit the water
      Next to sparkly paint on boats.

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    8. Back To Top    #28
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      And COVID 19

      Quote Originally Posted by That guy View Post
      Next to sparkly paint on boats.

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    9. Back To Top    #29
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      Saw a sign on Lake Francis Case that was just put up this year that they found them in there.
      Also I read an article that said because they clean the water it allows more sunlight to penetrate which in turns warms lakes up more than normal causing stress to some species of fish. I am guessing this is in shallower lakes.

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      There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, there is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar; I love not Man the less, but Nature more. -Lord Byron

    10. Back To Top    #30
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      Yes, Francis Case has them. So I am guessing Sharpe does too, lots of boat hopping there. And if Sharpe does, Oahe will too. With the amount of OOS spring fishing that happens on Francis Case it isn't a surprise. And they're taking them home to their lakes now too.
      Pickerel Lake in NE SD just was discovered to have zeebs too. So that means a lot of the NE part of the state is now going to have them shortly too.

      It's too much of a blanket statement to say that zeebs are over-rated. They will probably help certain waters but hurt others. Erie is a monster in itself as Allen noted. I don't think we have anything that compares to that situation in ND or SD. The effects of the zeebs in Erie are still occuring, listening to podcasts from Ross Robertson (the Erie guy IMO), he talks about that at length. Water clarity is changing and the fishing is changing with it. In other articles I have read about lakes in MN that have gotten zeebs, the fishing has changed considerably. Clearer water, deeper fish. Takes awhile for fisherman to adapt, many have fished a lake their whole lives and all of a sudden can't catch anything once the changes take place.

      I hate to throw in the towel but the floodgates are open. We may be able to slow it but they'll be everywhere soon enough.

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    11. Back To Top    #31
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      Quote Originally Posted by sdwxman View Post
      Allen, the Missouri River already has them below Gavin's Point Dam, and some have been found above the damn in Lewis and Clark Lake last year.
      They found them on a Missouri River system lake in MT so it is only a matter of time before ft Peck, Sakakawea, Oahe, and the rest of the Missouri in ND are covered in zebra mussels. Hopefully they can keep them out of Devils Lake but that’s bound to be the next place to get them.

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    12. Back To Top    #32
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      Quote Originally Posted by Allen View Post
      If they are in Lake LaMoure, that means they are in the James River. Once in the James, they now have a clear path to about half of the Missouri River.
      Allen, yes you are correct. This is what I read in the G&F bulletin sent out via email. Lake Lamoure and the James River in Dickey County are now considered Class 1 ANS infested waters. They join Lake Ashtabula, the only other infested waters in ND.

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    13. Back To Top    #33
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      Quote Originally Posted by Migrator Man View Post
      They found them on a Missouri River system lake in MT so it is only a matter of time before ft Peck, Sakakawea, Oahe, and the rest of the Missouri in ND are covered in zebra mussels. Hopefully they can keep them out of Devils Lake but that’s bound to be the next place to get them.
      You would have to be crazy to think that Devils Lake doesn't have them already.

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    14. Back To Top    #34
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      I would guess to say that every lake that was stocked from the valley city hatchery for the last 3 years has them.

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    15. Back To Top    #35
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      So the pressing question is how to harvest them and what to used them for?

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      I'm here to chew bubble gum and kick ass.... and I'm all out of bubble gum. RIP Rowdy

    16. Back To Top    #36
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      Quote Originally Posted by Traxion View Post
      Yes, Francis Case has them. So I am guessing Sharpe does too, lots of boat hopping there. And if Sharpe does, Oahe will too. With the amount of OOS spring fishing that happens on Francis Case it isn't a surprise. And they're taking them home to their lakes now too.
      Pickerel Lake in NE SD just was discovered to have zeebs too. So that means a lot of the NE part of the state is now going to have them shortly too.

      It's too much of a blanket statement to say that zeebs are over-rated. They will probably help certain waters but hurt others. Erie is a monster in itself as Allen noted. I don't think we have anything that compares to that situation in ND or SD. The effects of the zeebs in Erie are still occuring, listening to podcasts from Ross Robertson (the Erie guy IMO), he talks about that at length. Water clarity is changing and the fishing is changing with it. In other articles I have read about lakes in MN that have gotten zeebs, the fishing has changed considerably. Clearer water, deeper fish. Takes awhile for fisherman to adapt, many have fished a lake their whole lives and all of a sudden can't catch anything once the changes take place.

      I hate to throw in the towel but the floodgates are open. We may be able to slow it but they'll be everywhere soon enough.
      Here is my question. Do zebra mussels contribute to more weed growth? Ive fished Ashtabula my whole life and i have never seen it this weedy. Especially up north.

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    17. Back To Top    #37
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      Quote Originally Posted by thriller1 View Post
      Here is my question. Do zebra mussels contribute to more weed growth? Ive fished Ashtabula my whole life and i have never seen it this weedy. Especially up north.
      Yes they contribute to weed growth due to increased water clarity. Or that is at least the theory. Obviously, some plants aren't going to grow beyond a certain depth in most cases, so this can be argued to a point. I think you would have to see a marked difference in water clarity for weed growth to explode, but that is just a guess.

      It's a pretty polarizing topic, almost like COVID. We don't have a huge data set on the effects of zeebs and comparing an Ashtabula or Pickerel to Francis Case to Eric really isn't realistic, too many factors there. What we know is there have been significant positive and negative effects on different bodies of water. And, the cycle isn't through on most, so we don't know the end game yet. Ask your kids in about 30 years if the fishing there is the same as they were growing up. They'll know way more than we ever will on the subject!

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