Growing Raspberry Bushes

NDwalleyes

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Posts
2,431
Likes
459
Points
333
Location
Bismarck, ND
When I retire I want to be able to go outside, take a leak of my deck and pick a bowel of fresh raspberries and cream for breakfast. Looking at planting a 40 foot length of Raspberry bushes and been doing some research. What do you guys recommend for variety? How many berries will I get from 20 plants (2 foot spacing)? I'm considering Heritage variety. Any insight as to using a trellis or tips and tricks would be great.
 


DirtyMike

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2015
Posts
12,069
Likes
378
Points
428
Location
Bismarck, ND
I think the biggest thing is the soil. Can't help you out other than that. I'm interested in others answers.
 

NDwalleyes

Founding Member
Founding Member
Thread starter
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Posts
2,431
Likes
459
Points
333
Location
Bismarck, ND
I think the biggest thing is the soil. Can't help you out other than that. I'm interested in others answers.

Funny you say that. The research I've done talks about using healthy soil with a good nutrient level. I want to say I've heard they like a certain PH range, but I can't find any information to support it. They will be going into virgin soil so I should be good as far as nutrient levels.
 

Vollmer

Founder
Administrator
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Posts
6,348
Likes
862
Points
483
Location
Surrey, ND
The wife and I are looking to do the same thing. We put 10 plants in last year. Some raspberry plants that she got from a friend, not sure what variety. We transplanted the plants. They all seemed to do fine right away, but then withered away towards mid summer. I think that the soil had a lot to do with it, although the strawberries took off just fine. Going to try again this year in a spot that I believe has better topsoil. Once a guy gets them going I think you are set. The lady we got the plants from has them growing like wild-fire.
 

NDwalleyes

Founding Member
Founding Member
Thread starter
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Posts
2,431
Likes
459
Points
333
Location
Bismarck, ND
The wife and I are looking to do the same thing. We put 10 plants in last year. Some raspberry plants that she got from a friend, not sure what variety. We transplanted the plants. They all seemed to do fine right away, but then withered away towards mid summer. I think that the soil had a lot to do with it, although the strawberries took off just fine. Going to try again this year in a spot that I believe has better topsoil. Once a guy gets them going I think you are set. The lady we got the plants from has them growing like wild-fire.

I think when Lincoln Oakes/NRCS has their sale here in a couple weeks they will have bare root ones there.... at least they did last year. Transplanting can be tricky business especially if there is any size to the plant. We transplanted some trees from the lake and our survival rate has been about 50% for ponderosa pines about 2 foot tall. I think it comes down to soil to root contact when you replant. When we lost our ponderosas they did the same thing, looked good for the summer and then burned up in the fall...I don't think the root systems rebounds fast enough after replanting.
 


Norske

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2015
Posts
600
Likes
5
Points
143
Location
Moorhead, MN
We had raspberries for many years. If they take, your problem will be one of control. Before it's too late, stake out the patch and support the stems to keep paths between the rows open. They will spread from sucker roots and "tip layering" which means if a vine touches the ground, it will start another plant. To maintain peak production, prune any stems that are over three year old (you can tell by the size of the thorns). Peak production is early in the plant's life, 2-3 years old.

I have no idea what to do if they don't start. We never had that problem. Raspberries spreading into neighbor's gardens would have been our problem, but they liked the berries, too.
 

DirtyMike

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2015
Posts
12,069
Likes
378
Points
428
Location
Bismarck, ND
ND, I might be thinking of blueberries. I know my parents neighbor has a ton of raspberry bushes. Enough that I could hide in the middle and eat until I was sick.
 

muskelllunge13

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2015
Posts
216
Likes
0
Points
118
Location
Bismarck
I have Autumn Bliss raspberrys, a fall bearing raspberry. Start producing in early august till hard frost. Started 8 roots a friend gave me 15 years ago, have a BIG patch now. VERY easy to take care of as the fruit is set on the new years growth. All you have to do is take the bushhog over the patch in late oct or april. Large very tasty raspberry.
 

Kentucky Windage

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2015
Posts
5,323
Likes
465
Points
368
Location
Wendy Peffercorn’s Bedroom
Just ordered 6 varieties. We chose ours based on zone hardiness and maturity. We should have raspberry production from early summer into the fall. Contact Dr. Harlene Hatterman-Valenti from NDSU. She can provide you with a list of proven varieties in ND as well as any other questions you might have.
 

NDwalleyes

Founding Member
Founding Member
Thread starter
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Posts
2,431
Likes
459
Points
333
Location
Bismarck, ND
Thanks for the replies/advise. Great to have the old group together again! Lots of smart folks on this site.
 


Davey Crockett

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2015
Posts
13,941
Likes
1,429
Points
563
Location
Boondocks
Kentucky where did you order from ? I need to get some started again too. My Mom had a nice patch but the deer cleaned her out , Once they got a taste for them they would eat them right to the ground. We have wild ones (spread from deer and birds) scattered here and there if your lucky you will find 3 or 4 berries on them. I transplanted a few but they didn't make it.
 

Radar13

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2015
Posts
517
Likes
1
Points
156
Location
Bismarck ND
If you are in Bismarck and want some Raspberry bushes. I'm not sure kind they are but we are raspberried out. wife wants to dig them up. we started with 7 plants and they went crazy. send me a pm and come get some
 

Kentucky Windage

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 25, 2015
Posts
5,323
Likes
465
Points
368
Location
Wendy Peffercorn’s Bedroom
Kentucky where did you order from ? I need to get some started again too. My Mom had a nice patch but the deer cleaned her out , Once they got a taste for them they would eat them right to the ground. We have wild ones (spread from deer and birds) scattered here and there if your lucky you will find 3 or 4 berries on them. I transplanted a few but they didn't make it.

We ordered them from the Jung catalog. We cross referenced the varieties with what NDSU recommended.
 

Davey Crockett

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 22, 2015
Posts
13,941
Likes
1,429
Points
563
Location
Boondocks
Thanks for the offers, Found out we can get some from my Sister in law and will order a few of another variety . In cases where they spread like crazy are you guys tilling around them ? I was thinking I would till rows and mow between them but I want the rows to thicken up
 


Norske

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 24, 2015
Posts
600
Likes
5
Points
143
Location
Moorhead, MN
When they spread, it's spade time. The roots are a bit tough for easy tilling. At times we dug up root balls 1/2 the size of a bowling ball and gave them to others.
 

Lycanthrope

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
May 6, 2015
Posts
6,345
Likes
1,396
Points
533
Location
Bismarck
Nourse Farms is one of the best places I have found to get raspberries. When I ordered mine, they were large enough that I took root cuttings from many of them and got several more plants than I originally bought out of them. Raspberries dont need stems to grow, if you have a good 4" or larger section of root, if you plant it properly, it should grow. I planted 3 varieties 2 years ago and I got massive amounts of berries last summer. I got all fall bearing for ease of maintenance, you just cut them to the ground every fall and they regrow in the spring. I got Caroline, Anne and Polka after doing fairly extensive research into production studies conducted by Universities. I like all 3 but Anne are definitely less productive then the other two. Put them in a place where you can till around the outside of the rows and that will help keep them from spreading, I till in the fall and when plants come up in the spring, outside of the rows, they are fairly easy to pull up as they are already broken off from the root system below ground. Dont do a 'patch' as they will grow so dense, harvesting inside will be very difficult. Plan for rows no more than 24 inches wide and you will need a support system for the canes. If you just get give away raspberries, dont expect large or sweet berries, there has been a ton of improved varieties coming out in the last decade or two, and if you grab some from someones back yard, if they dont know what type they are, odds are you are getting some very substandard genetics. If I had to recommend one variety, for flat out production I would suggest Caroline. They will do better in sandy soil than clay, but its hard to keep raspberries from growing, seriously. If you can grow plants, raspberries should be easy to master. If starting out, I would amend your soil depending on its structure with sand and pelletized sulfur an some good composted manure. If it is low in organic material, wouldnt hurt to add some bales of peat too. Till everything in well and plant. It would be best to prepare your spot the fall before planting, to let your soil mature a little, especially if using manure that might be slightly hot or fresher. If you dont want to till around your plants, you can also use some sort of edging to contain them. I would consider using wood, preferably cedar because it will last longer with ground contact, but you could also use pine. Bury it so that its at least 4 inches under ground and it is angled slightly so that it pushes the runners to the surface, instead of deeper (then they would just grow under the barrier). This will keep most of the roots from escaping. I havent had problems tilling between my rows, but I do it every fall, it would probably be more difficult if you tried to do it less often. Keep in mind that fruit flies have spread to ND now and you will need to spray for them or else pick your berries often and slightly early.
 

NDwalleyes

Founding Member
Founding Member
Thread starter
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Posts
2,431
Likes
459
Points
333
Location
Bismarck, ND
Just ordered 6 varieties. We chose ours based on zone hardiness and maturity. We should have raspberry production from early summer into the fall. Contact Dr. Harlene Hatterman-Valenti from NDSU. She can provide you with a list of proven varieties in ND as well as any other questions you might have.

This was great advise. I sent Dr. Hatterman-Valenti an email and thought I'd share her response.....

.....I began to wonder if you were considering purple raspberries as well as red raspberries. Most of the purples are hardy enough for North Dakota and have crown growth instead of the creeping root system. The three I would recommend would be ‘Brandywine’, ‘Royalty’, or ‘Amesyth’. The first two will be easier to find as ‘Amesyth’ was an ISU release in the 1950’s.

One other reason for going with purple raspberries instead of red would be the spotted winged drosophila which two years ago was positively identified in North Dakota. This fruit fly actually inserts eggs into fruit before the fruit ripens so that by the time the fruit is ripe, little white larvae are present making the fruit unmarketable. I suppose one could still eat the infested fruit, but I have a weak stomach when it comes to eating miniature fly maggots. This fruit fly seems to be attracted to red as most of the samples that have been positively identified with SWD larvae have been red tart cherries and red raspberries. We intend to do more studies on this fruit fly now that we know it’s in North Dakota, but thought it would be good for you to be aware of it as well.

- - - Updated - - -

Nourse Farms is one of the best places I have found to get raspberries. When I ordered mine, they were large enough that I took root cuttings from many of them and got several more plants than I originally bought out of them. Raspberries dont need stems to grow, if you have a good 4" or larger section of root, if you plant it properly, it should grow. I planted 3 varieties 2 years ago and I got massive amounts of berries last summer. I got all fall bearing for ease of maintenance, you just cut them to the ground every fall and they regrow in the spring. I got Caroline, Anne and Polka after doing fairly extensive research into production studies conducted by Universities. I like all 3 but Anne are definitely less productive then the other two. Put them in a place where you can till around the outside of the rows and that will help keep them from spreading, I till in the fall and when plants come up in the spring, outside of the rows, they are fairly easy to pull up as they are already broken off from the root system below ground. Dont do a 'patch' as they will grow so dense, harvesting inside will be very difficult. Plan for rows no more than 24 inches wide and you will need a support system for the canes. If you just get give away raspberries, dont expect large or sweet berries, there has been a ton of improved varieties coming out in the last decade or two, and if you grab some from someones back yard, if they dont know what type they are, odds are you are getting some very substandard genetics. If I had to recommend one variety, for flat out production I would suggest Caroline. They will do better in sandy soil than clay, but its hard to keep raspberries from growing, seriously. If you can grow plants, raspberries should be easy to master. If starting out, I would amend your soil depending on its structure with sand and pelletized sulfur an some good composted manure. If it is low in organic material, wouldnt hurt to add some bales of peat too. Till everything in well and plant. It would be best to prepare your spot the fall before planting, to let your soil mature a little, especially if using manure that might be slightly hot or fresher. If you dont want to till around your plants, you can also use some sort of edging to contain them. I would consider using wood, preferably cedar because it will last longer with ground contact, but you could also use pine. Bury it so that its at least 4 inches under ground and it is angled slightly so that it pushes the runners to the surface, instead of deeper (then they would just grow under the barrier). This will keep most of the roots from escaping. I havent had problems tilling between my rows, but I do it every fall, it would probably be more difficult if you tried to do it less often. Keep in mind that fruit flies have spread to ND now and you will need to spray for them or else pick your berries often and slightly early.

Lycan...Great to have you back! Thanks for the information.
 

Vollmer

Founder
Administrator
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Posts
6,348
Likes
862
Points
483
Location
Surrey, ND
Nourse Farms is one of the best places I have found to get raspberries. When I ordered mine, they were large enough that I took root cuttings from many of them and got several more plants than I originally bought out of them. Raspberries dont need stems to grow, if you have a good 4" or larger section of root, if you plant it properly, it should grow. I planted 3 varieties 2 years ago and I got massive amounts of berries last summer. I got all fall bearing for ease of maintenance, you just cut them to the ground every fall and they regrow in the spring. I got Caroline, Anne and Polka after doing fairly extensive research into production studies conducted by Universities. I like all 3 but Anne are definitely less productive then the other two. Put them in a place where you can till around the outside of the rows and that will help keep them from spreading, I till in the fall and when plants come up in the spring, outside of the rows, they are fairly easy to pull up as they are already broken off from the root system below ground. Dont do a 'patch' as they will grow so dense, harvesting inside will be very difficult. Plan for rows no more than 24 inches wide and you will need a support system for the canes. If you just get give away raspberries, dont expect large or sweet berries, there has been a ton of improved varieties coming out in the last decade or two, and if you grab some from someones back yard, if they dont know what type they are, odds are you are getting some very substandard genetics. If I had to recommend one variety, for flat out production I would suggest Caroline. They will do better in sandy soil than clay, but its hard to keep raspberries from growing, seriously. If you can grow plants, raspberries should be easy to master. If starting out, I would amend your soil depending on its structure with sand and pelletized sulfur an some good composted manure. If it is low in organic material, wouldnt hurt to add some bales of peat too. Till everything in well and plant. It would be best to prepare your spot the fall before planting, to let your soil mature a little, especially if using manure that might be slightly hot or fresher. If you dont want to till around your plants, you can also use some sort of edging to contain them. I would consider using wood, preferably cedar because it will last longer with ground contact, but you could also use pine. Bury it so that its at least 4 inches under ground and it is angled slightly so that it pushes the runners to the surface, instead of deeper (then they would just grow under the barrier). This will keep most of the roots from escaping. I havent had problems tilling between my rows, but I do it every fall, it would probably be more difficult if you tried to do it less often. Keep in mind that fruit flies have spread to ND now and you will need to spray for them or else pick your berries often and slightly early.

;:;bowdown well done!
 


Recent Posts

Friends of NDA

Top Posters of the Month

  • This month: 113
  • This month: 93
  • This month: 82
  • This month: 74
  • This month: 73
  • This month: 62
  • This month: 49
  • This month: 47
  • This month: 46
  • This month: 40
Top Bottom