Raise maggots!!!

Lycanthrope

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Found this on the web, some might find it interesting/helpful. Maggots make great panfish bait, as well as food for reptile pets or birds.
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Maggots are the larvae of the common house fly. Contrary to popular belief, you don't need rotten meat to raise them.

We used plastic tubs with a 6-7 inch lip without the lid on. Then we mixed one gallon of wheat bran with 1/2 cup of powered milk. We added enough water so that the mixture was moist but not wet enough that water settled out of the mixture. The flies would lay their eggs in this mixture.

It took 7 days to produce a crop so we had 7 tubs and kept a rotation going. A gallon of bran would produce about a pint of very clean, disease free maggots. We used a household seeve to harvest the maggots. The must be harvested at the end of 7-8 days or they will become adult flies.
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I also found another thread that says you can harvest maggots by mixing with water, the maggots will float to the surface where they can be skimmed off using a strainer....
 


Davey Crockett

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It all looks good on the web but they leave out the details. One time I had this great idea to raise waxworms in my basement , It didn't last long, They stunk worse than billygoats.
 

Lycanthrope

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I wouldnt do it in the house, but during warm weather, might be an ok outdoor project, especially if you live out of town somewhere. Also if you live on water, Ive heard of people collecting roadkill and hanging it in a cage off the end of their dock. The maggots will eat the dead animal and when they are big/ready to pupate they will drop off, into the water, providing a great source of food for fish. I guess you can attract quite a population of panfish that way, if you dont mind the smell.
 

RustyTackleBox

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Another great way is to throw your fish guts in a bucket and forget about it...
 




Lycanthrope

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No, I dont eat bugs as a general practice.....
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Maggot farmer produces 10 million a year for bait

Saturday, November 19, 2005 By Bob Gwizdz

ORLEANS -- Like many farmers, Herb Seibelman gets started with his chores at the crack of dawn. Unlike many farmers, he harvests his crop daily, putting it in cold storage until the market for it develops, as it will, in the months ahead.

Freshness isn't a concern. Kept at temperatures in the mid to upper 30s, Seibelman's product will last almost indefinitely, he says. Long enough, at any rate, to provide seed for next fall's crop.

But Seibelman, 67, doesn't produce fruit or vegetables, grain or livestock. And although his crop is used as a feed-product, it won't be used in any other agricultural activity, but rather as an important part of a pastime.

Seibelman raises maggots, commonly known in ice-fishing parlance as "spikes," or, perhaps a bit more technically accurate, fly larva. Not just any fly larva, Seibelman says; he produces larva from large blow flies, bigger than your run-of-the-mill house flies, so they produce bigger than your run-of-the-mill maggots.

"I try to produce a good bait," says Seibelman, who has been growing fly larva -- he calls them "bugs" -- commercially since the early 1970s.

The key, Seibelman said, is providing them plenty of food. So Seibelman maintains a massive feed pile -- made up primarily of road-killed deer carcasses and what's left of deer after meat processors get through with them.

"The longer you can keep feed to them, the bigger they get," Seibelman said. "They just gorge themselves, basically."

Big is the operative word. Seibelman likes his spikes big enough to offer fish a meal. After he's harvested his crop, he sorts it with a strainer. Any "bugs" that fall through the screen are rejected.

"I hate to see somebody out fishing without good bait," Seibelman said. "You want a bait that works. There's nothing worse than fishing with something when you want to be fishing with something else."

In a given year, Seibelman will raise some 10 million spikes. He gets only a fraction of a fraction of a penny apiece for them -- he sells them to distributors in lots of 25,000 -- so volume is a key to his business.

"Ten years ago, I had eight million of them and I ran out," Seibelman said. "So every year now, I put up 10 million."

It's all about timing, Seibelman says. Start too early in the year, he says, and the local flies will take over your feed pile. He needs cool weather -- "colder weather seems to produce a bigger bug," he says -- but not so cold that the flies freeze.

"If it gets too cold, there's no flies," he said. "If there's no flies, there's no eggs, there's no bugs."

This fall has been a difficult one for Seibelman, who says on his best day ever, he produced about a million and a half bugs. The unusually warm autumn not only set back his planting season -- Seibelman begins by letting about 100,000 of last year's larvae loose in the feed pile -- but it's made it hard for him to come up with the deer parts he needs for feed.

Deer hunting has been a little slow so far this year because of the warm weather, he said.

Seibelman stores his bugs in a walk-in cooler in large aluminum wash tubs. He keeps somewhere between 75,000 to 85,000 in a tub full of saw dust. Too many in a tub and they start to die.

"I don't like dead ones in my buckets," he said. "Nothing lives in its own dead. Not even maggots.

"You take a box of something that's half dead and the whole box will soon be."

Although he didn't start raising spikes until the 1970s, Seibelman says he's been in the bait business his whole life, "since I was a kid on a bicycle," he said. "I started out picking cow flop grubs, catching crickets, cutting corn borers.

"In those days, people went fishing for something to do. Today, people are so busy they've got to take a vacation to go fishing. They've got to make a point of it."

Seibelman graduated from catching to growing bait, first with wax worms, which are the larva of the bee moth and probably the top ice-fishing bait in this part of the country.

"That became a 24-hour job, seven days a week," he said. "Wax worms are a lot of work. I bailed out of it."

But about the same time, he started buying raw furs and found he had a lot of carcasses to dispose of. So he decided to put them to work -- in a spike garden.

The season for spikes is short in this part of the country, though the bait is starting to catch on elsewhere during soft-water season.

"It's becoming more popular as a summer bait," Seibelman said. "Wisconsin and Indiana use them more. In Pennsylvania, they're starting to use them for trout fishing.

"Michigan is kind of slow. In Michigan, everybody uses nightcrawlers. They think they have to have a half-pound bait to catch bluegills."
 

Wild and Free

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They are a widely used medical instrument / practice now along with leaches to serve the same purpose of eating dead flesh in large open wounds and or to pull blood from areas to lessen the possibility of infection and or gangrene.

I need to go into business once I figure out where my dog finds all the dead stinking rotting animal parts she drags into the house through the pet door.
 

NodakBuckeye

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Interesting read; I have an incredibly patient wife but maggot farming might be on the fringe of acceptable behavior. On the other hand; hanging a few carcasses seething with fly larvae around your dock or favorite spot would go along ways towards keeping the pressure down.
 

Brian Renville

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Interesting read; I have an incredibly patient wife but maggot farming might be on the fringe of acceptable behavior. On the other hand; hanging a few carcasses seething with fly larvae around your dock or favorite spot would go along ways towards keeping the pressure down.

I was getting curious about trying this until I thought the same thing! I would be look at as a guy with a fishing addiction to a complete psychopath real quick.
 


Lycanthrope

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Ok, so Im a sucker for new experiments, and I happened to have a bag of soybean meal in my shed that I use for organic fertilizer, soooo I mixed up a half cup of powdered milk with about 12 cups of soybean meal, wetted so it was fairly moist and put it in an old milk jug out by my rabbits, where there are usually a few flies hanging out anyway. Well see if they find it interesting enough to get some maggots going. Might have to head down to Oahe to find some of those slab crappie if I get a good harvest.... If nothing else, it will make good creek chub bait!

As an added attractant, I threw a couple scraps of fish meat on top of it after I got back from fishing last night.
 
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Pigsticker

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Can you imagine the smells that maggot farmer has to tolerate with all that carcass feed laying around. I'll bet his Olfactory isn't so sharp anymore. Yuck
 

svnmag

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You guys need to be careful. I slipped one time and got one stuck in my urethra.
 

Davey Crockett

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Lycan said Ok, so Im a sucker for new experiments, and I happened to have a bag of soybean meal in my shed.



Last year we found meal worms in some flour and I really scratched my head because my wife puts it in an airtight sealed container and when it gets low she fills it back up so I was trying to figure out how these meal worms appear from thin air, The article below explains it. These would be easy to raise. We threw the flour out and never gave it a second thought , When I was reading I saw that people are asking if wormy flour is still good, The response was yes, That's why you sift flour. We never even gave it a second thought and threw it away, Now I wish I would have saved it and put it in a tub and raised them . Brings up another question , Would you rather eat organic wormy flour or treated with chemical flour ?


images



Often, bug eggs are already in the flour when you buy it


The good news is, that many grain products are now being treated with the addition ’food grade’ diatomaceous earth...not the same grade as the DE used in swimming pool filters or agriculture.

I read about this when I was researching using the DE for flea control on our pets...trying to get away from using pesticide on them and find a natural solution.

You’ll notice that most recipes call for ’sifting’ your flour, baking soda and baking powder...simply because there’s always the possibility of beetle eggs being in it.

One trick that I use when I buy these products, is freezing my flour, rice and pasta for three days...then bringing it to room temperature, making sure the box is dry before storing it on the pantry shelf.
 
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Lycanthrope

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If you find worms in your flour and sift it to remove them, you know there is still WORM POOP in the flour right? Yum Yum!!
 


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