Moon Phases and Walleye

Vollmer

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I found this article:


Moon Phase Fishing
Hone in On More Walleye by Observing Moon Phases

As a successful walleye angler, it is important for you to use all the tools that you can in order to snag that big catch consistently.


One tool which anglers often overlook is understanding how the phases of the moon relate to how walleye, and other fish, react. It's long been accepted that the phases of the moon can affect how people act. The moon affects the tides and, since people's bodies are mostly water, it can affect people's reactions. It stands to reason that, because of the affect it has on tides, it also affects how good or bad the fishing in a certain area at a certain time is.

During the days surrounding new and full moons, it has been scientifically proven that walleye really *love* to eat. They love to eat all the time, of course, but at those times they eat even more. Record breaking walleye have been caught at those times. Also, during those times, the fishing tends to be equally good during the day or at night.

Like many other types of fish, walleye tend to spawn on the moon phases. So, an angler who fishes for walleye around the full or new moon is likely to find them more easily. They also tend to be more aggressive and willing to strike more readily during those times, playing right into your hands.


Also, the full or new moon phases can be even more useful to an angler, depending on what the weather patterns have been like. If the local weather has been bad, the walleye won't have been eating as often. Therefore, they will be even more likely to strike ferociously at anything that moves during the full or new moon.
The rise and set of both the sun and the moon each day cause walleye to be more active. This is especially true of the sun setting and moon rising at night.


Combining both the daily and monthly moon habits can be especially beneficial. Walleye are very active around the nightly moon rise during the full or new moon phases, in other words. So, anglers who fish for walleye in the early evening during the few days surrounding the full or new moon are more likely to bag some big walleye.


Keeping charts of how the sun and moon rising and setting and the monthly full and new moon affect fishing in a specific body of water can be useful to angler, too. Not every body of water in ever region is exactly alike. The walleye and other fish will be affected in slightly different ways, depending on where a person is fishing.


So, a successful walleye angler should be part astronomer, almost. They need to know how the moon and sun affect the tides and the fish. Knowing the phases of the moon and how they affect walleye fishing can turn an average angler into a huge success or turn a seasoned angler into a fishing superstar.



But, I was listening to a podcast with Mark Martin, and he stated that night fishing on a full moon is usually brutal. His tip was to fish hard and fast while the moon is between the horizon and 1/2 way up. Also when moon is half way down 'til it hits the horizon again. He stated that this is true at night and during the day.

Has anyone tested out how the moon can play a role in walleye fishing? I find this to be extremely interesting.
 


Rowdie

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In the early 2000's I went out in mid August during the full moon. I trolled deep diving cranks to 25' and targeted suspended fish. If I got shallower than 35' I went deeper, out to 55'. This was in Mobridge out over moose flats. I hooked 6 or 7, but only landed 4 (wife was my partner lol). They were all pig fish over 5 lbs. My brother had just fished in the couples tournament a day before, and I remember my 4 would have won it. A couple of the ones I lost were real pigs, didn't get a good look.

Tried it again the next year and the lower end unit went out on using in the middle of the three bridges, that was a long night. I've never did again, but want to!
 

Flatrock

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It's an interesting read. I'm not sure it makes a huge difference but I'll have to pay closer attention to it this year and see if I notice the same thing.
 

johnr

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fishing the evening bite has become more of a thing for me. As I have aged, getting up at 4 am to hit the water has lost its appeal. I have a good friend from Fargo, who like a young man cant even sleep if he is fishing the next morning, he is hard to have as a fishing partner, as I would rather sleep until 6 or so, then take my chances with what is left of the morning bite, and fish later into the day.

According to this read your success in the pre-evening hours are just as good as the predawn. I am going to have to get him to read this, and maybe we could get a couple more hours of morning sleep next trip
 


lunkerslayer

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Moon phase and barometric pressure are the two most important assets I use when ice fishing. I have it figured out most days but sometimes it doesn't matter. I was taught how read the moon phase and barometric pressure by my grand father and I can testify that it does work. That fishing chart they have on your phones or gps units are garbage.
Oh good post Vollmer
 

MuskyManiac

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Along with monthly moon phases playing a factor there are also daily moon positions that are key. Moon rise and set are obvious, but moon directly overhead and moon directly underfoot are two other key times to make sure you're on your best spots and fishing your "A game".
 

KDM

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I wish the walleyes on the Sheyenne River would read that article. The only pattern I've encountered on the Sheyenne that has stood the test of time is the Early Spring and Late Fall feeding blitz where the walleyes get suicidal. This pattern only lasts about 2 weeks in each season. The other times the rule book is thrown out and the walleyes do whatever they darn well please regardless of what the moon, barometric pressure, sun spots, or the rest of the world are doing. That's why I LOVE that river. It changes almost by the hour. Given my druthers, I prefer to fish the full moon as I can see the ground and the crap that's going to hit me in the melon while walking the river bank. LOL!! I'm not discounting the information in the article one bit. It's just that I haven't seen much of a difference in fishing success on a new, full, or other phase of the moon with regards to the Sheyenne River.
 

Enslow

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The moon orbits the earth... Just sayin...
 


johnr

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A guy has two lose some teeth and move to Dickinson to understand haha.

we might not have all our teeth, but we be smart with science and stuff.

- - - Updated - - -

At least I don't use a pork chop to brush my hair
 

Enslow

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I eat pork chops on a waning crescent moon.
 

martinslanding

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I eat pork chops on a waning crescent moon.

A pork chop refers to any of the cuts of the pig perpendicular to the spine. Some cuts of pork chops can be high in cholesterol-raising saturated fat and calories, but a lean pork chop, such as a sirloin or top loin chop, is the basis for a healthy meal. Braise, roast or grill your chops instead of frying them to avoid adding excessive fat during cooking.

High in Protein

Pork chops have 24 grams of protein in a 3-ounce portion. Protein provides four calories per gram, and it is an essential nutrient for repairing muscles after exercise and for maintaining a strong immune system. Healthy adults should get 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day, according to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. That amount is equivalent to about 55 grams per day for an individual who weighs 150 pounds. The protein in pork chops is high quality because it provides each of the amino acids that you need to get from your diet.
 


martinslanding

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Amino acids are made up.

bio_aa1.png
 

KDM

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XX + XY can equal XXXY, but does not necessarily equal XXXY forever. After a time the chemical bonds of XXXY can and do breakdown. In that event, XXXY unfortunately often equals XY - 1/2 XY's stuff adding to XX. Which then results in the creation of an XX150 and an XY50. Now a XY50 over time can and will become a full XY again, but full XY's are constantly attracted to XX's and especially attracted to an XX150 from of some other XY. The chemistry of this is unknown, but full XY's and XY50's seem to be unable to avoid an XX regardless of their multivariate compositions. Much research has been done on this phenomenon and as yet, it is still a mystery.
 


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