Ticks

Allen

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Note, you can buy cans of permethrin based spray for your clothing at places like Runnings. I picked some up last week. About $7-9 a can, depending on the brand.
 


snow

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if your serious about the outdoors this time of year during our booming tick season forget about deep woods off or like product here in Mn off is like an appetizer for these worthless critters,as stated above perm is our solution,and agreed so far a horrible tick spring.
 

bigbrad123

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My son and I used Permethrin for the first time this spring turkey hunting. Treated both sets of clothes a few days before we went. Worked like a charm. I think I had 3 on me total (used much less than on my son's clothes). My son didn't have any.
 

tikkalover

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I just have the wife walk ahead of me when we are in tick country. She is a tick magnet!! ;:;rofl
 

Lycanthrope

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Since I did the work in another thread, might as well share this here also...

permeth.JPG


368.JPG


To make a .5% active ingredient spray using a quart (32 fl oz) of concentrate with 36.8% of the active ingredient, you can mix it with water to create a solution. The calculation is as follows:

  1. Determine the amount of active ingredient in the concentrate:
    • 36.8% of 32 fl oz = 0.368 * 32 fl oz = 11.776 fl oz of active ingredient
  2. Calculate the amount of water needed to dilute the concentrate to a .5% solution:
    • For a .5% solution, the total amount of active ingredient in the final mixture should be 0.5% of the total volume. Let's call the total volume of the final mixture "V".
    • The equation to find the total volume "V" is: 0.005 * V = 11.776 fl oz
    • Solving for "V": V = 11.776 fl oz / 0.005 = 2355.2 fl oz
  3. Determine the number of gallons of .5% active ingredient spray:
    • Since 1 gallon = 128 fl oz, the total volume in gallons is: 2355.2 fl oz / 128 fl oz/gallon = 18.38671875 gallons
    • Therefore, you can make approximately 18.39 gallons of .5% active ingredient spray using a quart of concentrate with 36.8% of the active ingredient in it.
To find the cost of 18.39 gallons of spray, we first need to convert the volume from gallons to fluid ounces, as the cost is given in terms of fluid ounces. There are 128 fluid ounces in a gallon, so 18.39 gallons is equivalent to:

18.39 gallons * 128 fluid ounces/gallon = 2354.72 fluid ounces

Now, we know that 24 fluid ounces of spray costs $17.50. To find the cost of 2354.72 fluid ounces, we can set up a proportion:

24 fluid ounces / $17.50 = 2354.72 fluid ounces / x

Where x is the cost of 2354.72 fluid ounces of spray. Solving for x gives:

x = (2354.72 fluid ounces * $17.50) / 24 fluid ounces x = $17.50 * 98.11333... x = $1718.57

Therefore, 18.39 gallons of the same spray would cost approximately $1718.57.

To make a .5% concentrate spray from a 36.8% concentrate, you would need to dilute it with water. For a gallon (128 fluid ounces) of water, you would need to add approximately 0.43 fl oz of the 36.8% concentrate. This will result in a .5% concentration of the active ingredient in the final solution.

.43 fluid ounces is approximately 12.72 milliliters (ml).
1 milliliter = 1 gram of water = 1cm^3

I smell a potential GROUP BUY opportunity in the works!!!
 
Last edited:


SDMF

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Since I did the work in another thread, might as well share this here also...

permeth.JPG


368.JPG


To make a .5% active ingredient spray using a quart (32 fl oz) of concentrate with 36.8% of the active ingredient, you can mix it with water to create a solution. The calculation is as follows:

  1. Determine the amount of active ingredient in the concentrate:
    • 36.8% of 32 fl oz = 0.368 * 32 fl oz = 11.776 fl oz of active ingredient
  2. Calculate the amount of water needed to dilute the concentrate to a .5% solution:
    • For a .5% solution, the total amount of active ingredient in the final mixture should be 0.5% of the total volume. Let's call the total volume of the final mixture "V".
    • The equation to find the total volume "V" is: 0.005 * V = 11.776 fl oz
    • Solving for "V": V = 11.776 fl oz / 0.005 = 2355.2 fl oz
  3. Determine the number of gallons of .5% active ingredient spray:
    • Since 1 gallon = 128 fl oz, the total volume in gallons is: 2355.2 fl oz / 128 fl oz/gallon = 18.38671875 gallons
    • Therefore, you can make approximately 18.39 gallons of .5% active ingredient spray using a quart of concentrate with 36.8% of the active ingredient in it.
To find the cost of 18.39 gallons of spray, we first need to convert the volume from gallons to fluid ounces, as the cost is given in terms of fluid ounces. There are 128 fluid ounces in a gallon, so 18.39 gallons is equivalent to:

18.39 gallons * 128 fluid ounces/gallon = 2354.72 fluid ounces

Now, we know that 24 fluid ounces of spray costs $17.50. To find the cost of 2354.72 fluid ounces, we can set up a proportion:

24 fluid ounces / $17.50 = 2354.72 fluid ounces / x

Where x is the cost of 2354.72 fluid ounces of spray. Solving for x gives:

x = (2354.72 fluid ounces * $17.50) / 24 fluid ounces x = $17.50 * 98.11333... x = $1718.57

Therefore, 18.39 gallons of the same spray would cost approximately $1718.57.

To make a .5% concentrate spray from a 36.8% concentrate, you would need to dilute it with water. For a gallon (128 fluid ounces) of water, you would need to add approximately 0.43 fl oz of the 36.8% concentrate. This will result in a .5% concentration of the active ingredient in the final solution.

.43 fluid ounces is approximately 12.72 milliliters (ml).
1 milliliter = 1 gram of water = 1cm^3

I smell a potential GROUP BUY opportunity in the works!!!
So you're saying ~.5oz/Gal = bottle-strength Perm spray and you can make ~64 gal of bottle-strength spray for $47 worth of Perm concentrate?
 

wslayer

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Shelf life of said concentrate ? I would tip over before I got 5 gallons worth used.
 

Lycanthrope

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Shelf life of said concentrate ? I would tip over before I got 5 gallons worth used.
Ive had a bottle in my garage for 3-4 years and it seems to work fine still, likely store longer in a fridge, not sure about freezing it but it appears to be an oily substance so that could make it last decades?
 


wslayer

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Just picked up some Nexgard for the pup yesterday. That crap went up to $80 for 3 months worth. "ROBBERY"
Sorry did mean to ...hijacked...
 

Lycanthrope

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Just picked up some Nexgard for the pup yesterday. That crap went up to $80 for 3 months worth. "ROBBERY"
Sorry did mean to ...hijacked...
There have been reports and concerns regarding NexGard and its potential adverse effects on dogs. NexGard, a popular flea and tick preventative, belongs to a class of drugs known as isoxazolines, which have been associated with neurologic adverse reactions including muscle tremors, ataxia, and seizures in some dogs and cats. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a fact sheet about these potential adverse events associated with isoxazoline flea and tick products.

However, it's important to note that the FDA generally considers these products to be safe and effective for the majority of dogs and cats. The adverse events, although serious, are relatively rare. The FDA advises pet owners to consult with their veterinarian to review their pet's medical history and determine whether a product in the isoxazoline class is appropriate for their pet.

If you suspect your pet has had an adverse reaction to NexGard or any other medication, it's important to contact your veterinarian immediately. You can also report suspected adverse drug events to the manufacturer and the FDA to help them monitor the safety of these products.
-----------------------------
I wont give my dog systemic insecticides, seen and heard of too many nasty issues. Personally ive had the best luck with a good quality tick collar.
 

riverview

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been picking ticks for a few weeks now, I have a spot in my 40 acres of bush that has one spot that is terrible for ticks, I've seen 4-inch branches laying on the ground covered in ticks thousands of them. I've had 2 dogs test positive for Lyme disease, never asked for a Lyme test the vets just do it now, i guess. i didn't do anything as far as meds or anything for the dogs and they have been fine for years.
 

Lycanthrope

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For my dogs I use seresto collars, put them on for the summer and throw them in the freezer in the winter, been using the same collars for 4 years now and they still work fine...
 

svnmag

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It would take a while to collect enough I guess: I wonder how they'd taste roasted on a baking sheet like pumpkin seeds?
 


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