Bow Hunting Essentials

spyder250

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Just picked up my first bow and plan on going after the thirty pointer this fall. What are some of the items you guys would recommend picking up or wouldn't go without?
 


Vollmer

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For me its all about the prep gear. Field cameras. Feeders. Stand/Blind.
Good scent lock is a must, and tactics for washing clothes scent free, or at least with an outdoors scent to them. I put my gear in a paper bag the night before with apples/corn/carrots/etc.

tip of the iceberg
 

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dust in the wind

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Be sure to get arrows that are CORRECT for the bow and the configuration of the bow.


There are many to choose from and some "pro shops" will suggest an arrow but it may not be the best for your bow. yes, some guys will be spot on their recommendations, some not so much. I like to use pinwheel software to play around with arrow configurations so i can see what they arrow will do before I buy the arrows.


You can get the software from here - http://www.pinwheelsoftware.com/ Download the SFA trial - you'll get a 30 day trial. Select the bow and put in the draw weight, length, etc... do NOT change the cam settings. Let them be what the app sets them to.


There's more stuff to set in the program but it isn't necessary right now. Main thing is to play around with the arrows and find the arrow that fits the bow. If you have the wrong arrows, you'll be fighting tuning issues more than you should and will probably get frustrated. If you need help with that PM me and I'll help you out. Be sure to put in the weight on the string, fletchings, inserts and nock weights. this all helps with getting the arrow.


The software has been very accurate for my two bows as far as getting the arrow/length/point weight and all that set where tuning becomes very easy.




There's a lot more as far as tuning goes but that can be for another time. You asked about gear.


Release - probably wouldn't hurt to have a spare. Especially if you travel to hunt. Never know when one might break or get lost.




Depending on the bow, you might need to use some string silencers to help quiet the bow down.


String wax - get it and use it. It will make your string last longer.


Target - personal preference I guess. I stay away from the layered block type of targets. I shred them up too quickly. I have a good bag target and a rhinehart block target and a 3d target (mckenzie).


I like using trail cameras but nothing beats scouting and seeing the activity with your own eyes.


I don't worry too much about using stuff like scent lock and sprays - while I think it helps to a point, I play the wind more than anything.


Flashlight/Headlamp - get a good one. I like the headlamps since it keeps your hands free. Nothing worse than trying to field dress a deer in early season while holding a flashlight and fighting skeeters.

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You can always get into using rattling antlers, calls, scents, etc.... I have had some success (meaning deer responding to) - calls and rattling. Believe it or not, I got a buck to turn around and come back just by making an "uuuuurrrrrppppp" sound. No, it wasn't gas that was passed either. I didn't have any calls with me but darn if he didn't turn right around for me.

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I will wash my hunting cloths in scent free detergent and store them a scent proof bags.

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Here's a good resource to read through.

http://archeryhistory.com/archerytalk/The_Nuts&Bolts_of_Archery.pdf

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Get some moleskin to put on the shelf of the bow. Nothing worse than having an arrow tap the shelf area and make noise at the worse possible moment.

learn to tie the dloops and keep a few extra on hand. never know when one might fray and snap.

If you are going to hunt out of a tree stand - be sure to wear a safety harness. too many people fall out of trees and get seriously hurt or killed.
 
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DirtyMike

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What he said. Haha. Very good advice there. For me, range finder the first few times out. Until I can remember which tree is at 25 yards, etc. Early season it's a thermacell. Nothing can end a hunt faster for me than a swarm of Mosquitos. Essentials...extra d loop material, extra release, small set of Allen wrenches.
 

dust in the wind

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skeeters suck - Since I've been hunting out of a ground blind, I haven't had much of an issue with them. Not like being up in a tree!

range finder is good too. Some will use flagging tape to mark off the yardages. Different colors for different distances. Remember to take those yardages at ground level. 20 yards at something when you are 20Ft off the ground isn't the same as 20 yards on flat ground.
 
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Vollmer

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Was setting up stands for last year, but I think I'll setup a ground blind as well this year. It's just easier with my kiddos.
 

KDM

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The single most important thing to NEVER leave the house without........is PATIENCE. You're just starting out, you WILL get busted, screw up, and otherwise send yourself into fits of frustration because you made a mistake. Get over it, learn, and get back to deer hunting. Good Luck and welcome to the stick and string brigade.
 

SDMF

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Given the way things are going, I think the most essential thing a guy can get ASAP is a friggin tag! Order that summbich as soon as you get done reading this.
 


dust in the wind

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Given the way things are going, I think the most essential thing a guy can get ASAP is a friggin tag! Order that summbich as soon as you get done reading this.

yeah, they are not holding them until the rifle drawing is done either. Myself and others already have our tags in our possession.
 

huntorride365

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I've always got paracord. Many uses, bow pull up if the stand doesn't have a rope, tying quarters to a pack. Water is essential. Tags are nice.
 

coyotetrapper

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One thing that is overlooked I think is being comfortable in the stand. No matter what brand or type of stand make sure it is comfortable for you so you can sit for several hours if needed.
 

BP338

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All the things mentioned above are important. When I got into bow hunting I asked the same question to a buddy of mine. His response was somewhat surprising. He told me that the most important thing to do if you want to archery hunt is to shoot, shoot and then shoot some more! There are way too many guys out there that think it's cool to go "fling" some arrows at big game but don't have a friggin' clue what they are doing. The importance of being in tune with your bow is as important or even more important than having a tuned bow. It's the time that a giant buck walks out and doesn't give you time to pull out your range finder, or the time that your buck fever needs to be calmed by the confidence in a consistent shot.

One thing that threw me off is that I started off practicing without a full quiver on the bow. As soon as I put it on and filled it up with outfitted arrows my shot went from 1-3 inch groups at 40 yards to down and to the right. I had to adjust my mindset almost completely. The slightest tweek threw me off. And that is just one of many things...

;:;rant

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One thing that is overlooked I think is being comfortable in the stand. No matter what brand or type of stand make sure it is comfortable for you so you can sit for several hours if needed.

This is also important. If you shoot from a stand, a blind, on one need, leaning around something...Practicing these shots are important. Part of the confidence you build in yourself and your bow.
 


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