CWD survey Mich St Univerisity

Fritz the Cat

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Posts
5,001
Likes
537
Points
413
https://www.wkms.org/government-pol...ogist-agency-manipulated-data-on-deer-disease

Former TN Wildlife Resources Agency biologist: agency manipulated data on deer disease​

By Anita Wadhwani, Tennessee Lookout
Published September 7, 2023 at 11:20 AM CDT

A Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency vehicle.

John Partipilo
/
Tennessee Lookout
A Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency vehicle.

In a lawsuit filed against the agency, the former employee claims officials misled the public about the rate of neurological disorder in deer, changing protocols to avoid admitting mistakes​

A state biologist claims he was confronted in his home by law enforcement officers with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency on the same day he sent his boss’s superiors evidence that the state was falsifying data on wildlife diseases.
After his cell phone, laptops and other items were confiscated, the biologist said he was then subjected to hours of questioning by officers — among them the husband of his immediate supervisor.

James Kelly, a wildlife biologist, led the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s deer management program, chaired the agency’s CWD Deer Management Standing Team and served as a wildlife biologist until he was fired in 2022.
In a whistleblower lawsuit filed this week, Kelly alleges state officials manipulated data and misled the public about the prevalence of chronic wasting disease, a fatal and infectious disease that attacks deer populations.

He claims TWRA failed to follow best scientific practices and its own regulations in diagnosing potentially infected deer. He also claims TWRA chose to forgo more expensive and accurate lab testing then rewrote its regulations to keep its data mistakes from the public before dispatching law enforcement officers to Kelly’s home, interrogating him then firing him after he sought to make his allegations public.

The consequences of releasing inaccurate data, according to the lawsuit, was overinflated reporting of the prevalence of the disease in multiple Tennessee counties. Instead of 16 counties with confirmed CWD cases reported by the state, Kelly claims there have only ever been two: Hardeman and Fayette counties.

The over-reporting of cases leads to economic impacts in counties now avoided by some hunters and lost hunting fees collected by private property owners. It can also inadvertently lead to the spread of disease; once a county has been designated at risk for disease, diseased deer may be transported there for disposal, posing a potential infection hazard for otherwise uninfected deer in that county, the lawsuit said.

Incorrect reporting on disease prevalence can also increase public costs for state intervention and monitoring, including added staffing, testing, harvest incentive payments to hunters and carcass incinerators. According to TWRA’s most recent disease management plan, it spent more than $1.2 million on chronic waste disease in the last fiscal year.
“Incorrectly reporting the spread of CWD can have an economic impact on the counties where CWD is reportedly found, and it can have an impact on a state wildlife agency’s use of funds and resources,” the lawsuit said. TWRA has “engaged in fraud and mismanagement of its CWD program,” it said.

A spokesperson for TWRA declined to offer comment on pending litigation Wednesday but issued a statement that disputed claims that the state had publicized faulty data. The state’s protocols are based on “extensive vetting of the latest peer-reviewed research,” the statement said.
William Caldwell, Kelly’s attorney, declined comment.
Chronic wasting disease is a fatal neurological disorder with no known cure that affects deer and elk populations, whose carcasses can also remain contagious. According to the Centers for Disease Control, there have been no reported cases of human transmission. The detection of disease, however, requires state intervention and monitoring to prevent its spread.
The agency first detected disease in 10 deer harvested in Fayette and Hardeman Counties in 2018.
At the time, the lawsuit said, TWRA followed the same practice of every other state: first screening tissue through a process known as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) then getting a second, more expensive test using known as immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing to confirm positives. ELISA testing yields a high number of false positives, the lawsuit said.
But as the number of samples being collected grew, TWRA ceased using IHC testing to confirm the results. Today, 16 counties are designated as being positive or at high risk for disease.
Kelly, 36, in 2021 grew suspicious at the high number of positive results. He began reviewing lab results and concluded that too many counties were being added, and too fast. He shared his concern that tests were yielding inaccurate results with other TWRA officials. Officials agreed to send positive samples for further IHC testing. None of the tests were found positive under this testing method, the lawsuit said.

The lawsuit claims that rather than admit to hunters, local governments and wildlife officials that mistakes may have been made to designate all 16 counties as positive or at risk for CWD, the agency created new protocols that allowed state officials to ignore the results of the second test. It also claims the new protocols would allow the agency to keep from admitting mistakes to Kentucky wildlife officials, who expended resources creating disease response after TWRA officials reported a bordering Tennessee county had a positive test.
“In other words, rather than respond to the discrepancies in CWD testing results by following its rules and protocols, the TWRA changed the rules and protocols to avoid having to admit mistakes,” the lawsuit claims.

A spokesperson for TWRA said Wednesday agency personnel could not comment on pending legislation. But, in a statement released about the state testing methods, the agency disputed Kelly’s allegations about the validity of their tests.
“The ELISA test used at the laboratories to detect CWD prions has been shown to be effective for early detection of disease, including animals recently infected but not yet showing symptoms,” the statement said. “For the agency, the results are critical for the continued surveillance and monitoring of CWD. Last season was the first since the discovery of CWD in Tennessee there was not a spread of the disease to new counties, which we believe is a positive indicator that current management protocols are working.”

Frustrated by his efforts to call attention to the problem, Kelly said he wrote a memo to the Tennessee Fish and Wildlife Commission, the agency’s oversight board.
The day Kelly sent the memo, TWRA officers arrived at his home to hand deliver a letter placing him on leave. The wildlife law enforcement officers confiscated his cell phone, keys and laptops.
Kelly was then ordered to TWRA headquarters, where he was “questioned by law enforcement officers for hours” — among them a TWRA law enforcement officer married to Kelly’s immediate supervisor. The lawsuit calls Kelly’s treatment “malicious and willful.”
The lawsuit claims TWRA violated state laws protecting state employee and citizen whistleblower complaints. TWRA has not yet filed its legal response
 


luvcatchingbass

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Posts
3,471
Likes
198
Points
313
Location
SE ND.
A couple things from with Ted Nugent. Personally I enjoyed the podcast this spring, can't deny the passion the guy has.

Deer and Deer Hunting Podcast #53 April 2023


Deer and Deer Hunting Article From June 2015

TED NUGENT: IRRATIONAL CWD FEARS ARE HURTING THE HUNTING TRADITION​

Lord knows how I really hate to write these types of articles, but in this real world of fluctuation, in order to maximize the good, caring people must never back away from our “we the people” duties to fight the bad and ugly.

By Ted Nugent

I won’t bore you with the gory details of how chronic wasting disease was 1st discovered/created by Colorado bureaucrats back in 1967, or the technical scientific terminology gobblygook, but a cursory review of the documented facts surrounding this controversial condition found in deer should raise the hackles of all honest conservationists and deer lovers nationwide.


CWD has never negatively impacted any deerherd or deerhunting anywhere, whereas just a few short years ago, much to the anger of Wisconsin deerhunting families, Wisconsin, in their bizarre unsupportable over-reaction, slaughtered a few hundred thousand deer in that historically traditional deerhunting state. CWD didn’t hurt the Wisconsin herd, the CWD “eradication effort” did!!

And now, continuing the same insane mistake, the Michigan is doing the same horrible thing after finding a single doe that tested positive. Since destroying another couple thousand deer, no more cases of CWD have been found as of this writing.


And now Texas! I thought Texans knew better.

Dear God in heaven! What is going on here? CWD didn’t kill thousands of deer. The government agency sworn to protect and manage this precious resource and paid by hunters killed thousands of deer.

I dare anyone to attempt to explain this in honest, logical, scientifically supportable terms. Ain’t gonna happen. Can’t be done.

CWD was 1st identified/created in a Colorado testing facility operated by the state. CWD did NOT come from deer farms or hunting ranches. It was first discovered in wild mule deer.

When a deer at an Iowa deer farm was found to be positive for CWD, the Iowa DNR came in a killed every deer on the family property, destroying their livelihood with no believable explanation whatsoever.

Compare this action to the game department of South Dakota when the highest incidence of CWD was found in their Wind River park elk herd. When the infected elk herd outgrew the carrying capacity of that high fence state preserve, South Dakota simply lowered the fence to allow the exposed elk to escape into the Custer National Park.

Iowa violently over-reacted with ZERO science or evidence to support their actions, destroying the private property of a family, while the state of SD admitted that the CWD exposed elk posed no risk to wild herds of deer and elk.

Hey bureaucrats, which is it? A dangerous wildlife threat or no threat at all? Good grief.

CWD doesn’t pose a threat to deer. EHD, blue tongue, rabies, brusellosis, anthrax and other real diseases and bureaucrats have indeed hurt wildlife and deer. Why the hysteria over a non-threatening disease/condition?

I love deer. My life has forever been dedicated to optimize the health and bio-diversity of deer and wildlife. My lifetime earnings have been dedicated to perfecting wildlife habitat for game and nongame species because I am a reasoning predator and gungho steward.

Like millions and millions of American deerhunting families and real wildlife lovers, deer and all wildlife bring us prime quality of life.

Since CWD has never hurt wildlife in the big picture, but government bureaucrats have, I would highly recommend caring people do everything in our power to protect wildlife from real, tangible threats.

I implore my deeranddeerhunting.com BloodBrothers to watch this entire CWD documentary by Keith Warren. Then dare bureaucrats to attempt to deny it.

CWD is a scam and for the life of me cannot figure out why it is being jammed down our throats. Stand up and fight for what you believe in my friends. It really is us against them. Do it for our beloved deer and lifestyle.
 

Fritz the Cat

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Posts
5,001
Likes
537
Points
413
Outdoor Life now has a piece written about the lawsuit against Tennessee Wildlife Resources. Not going to post its entirety here but some paragraphs interested me.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/ot...1&cvid=1f7e7e3a4f1c4d328956376ebba68d1f&ei=51

At that time, the lawsuit points out, the TWRA’s 2018 Emergency Response Plan called for two separate lab tests to confirm whether a sample was positive for CWD. If the first test came back positive, then the sample was screened using a second type of testing the USDA calls the “gold standard” of CWD tests. This test is more accurate and more costly.

(NDA readers.... the ELISA test is $20 bucks but it is not 100% conclusive. Takes about ten days to get the results. If a suspect is found, they ship it off to NVSL or National Veterinary Services Lab in Ames Iowa. Cost is $40 bucks. But the time frame is more like 30 days to get results. Remember, not all suspects are positives. And the sampling is something else. It consists of the obex or spinal cord attaching to the brain and a lymph node. Much of what is sent in looks like it came from the other end of the deer.)

According to the lawsuit, Kelly’s investigation revealed that in 2020 the agency had begun to stray from the two-test procedure after heeding the advice of TWRA wildlife veterinarian Dr. Dan Grove. And in 2021, the agency began sending off test results to a lab in Mississippi as well as the C.E. Kord Animal Health Diagnostic Lab in Tennessee. This is when many of the data discrepancies that Kelly noticed were recorded, he claims.

(NDA readers... Dr. Dan Grove used to work for North Dakota Game and Fish. Dr. Dan Grove was also one of the thirty highly intelligent wildlife professionals (spoofing) who wrote the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies "Best Management Practices". It's 111 pages of gubment speak no one is going to read. It's criteria how to get money from Senate Bill 4111 Research and Mangement Act of $420 million dollars per year for the next six years. Senate Bill 4111 says States with the most CWD will get the most money. Therefore, it is incumbent upon all Game and Fish Departments to find as much CWD on the landscape as possible to get more of that money.)

The closer Kelly looked, the lawsuit alleges, the more he saw that the agency’s lab testing protocols seemed inconsistent. Some counties had been deemed “CWD-positive” after the first test came back positive but before the follow-up test was performed. This meant the agency was labeling counties CWD-positive before those results could be confirmed.

“Rather than respond to the discrepancies in CWD testing results by following its rules and protocols,” the lawsuit claims, “the TWRA changed the rules and protocols to avoid having to admit mistakes.”

But if Kelly’s allegations hold any water, then these numbers might be inflated. Ironically, that could also increase the likelihood that hunters have brought CWD into counties where it didn’t previously exist. Since Tennessee allows free transfer of CWD-positive carcasses between CWD-positive counties—in fact, it requires those carcasses be disposed of in positive counties only—there’s a chance prions have traveled into counties that weren’t truly CWD-positive to begin with.
 


svnmag

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2015
Posts
16,676
Likes
2,285
Points
773
Location
Here
The above vid leads me to believe CWD is akin to Alzheimer's and goes back to Kurt's point of not getting a straight answer about affecting humans.
 

NodakBob

Honored Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2022
Posts
225
Likes
217
Points
127
Location
bismarck
As a hunter though this is what concerns me. People that move to the edge of town then complain about deer eating their hostas should not be key influencers in this discussion.
Just like idiots that move into the Missouri River forest and then cut down all the trees in their yard cause they don’t like the leaves…
 

Fritz the Cat

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Posts
5,001
Likes
537
Points
413


In the video the fellow is wearing a National Deer Association shirt.

https://deerassociation.com/about/position-statements/

Baiting

The practice of baiting and its role in deer management have grown in terms of controversy and complexity in recent years. The NDA acknowledges the available scientific data surrounding this issue is incomplete and, at times, inconsistent. Therefore, the NDA has used the available scientific data and the experience of professional wildlife biologists in formulating the following Position Statement.
The NDA differentiates between baiting and supplemental feeding. Supplemental feeding is addressed in a separate Position Statement. The NDA defines baiting as the placement of food to concentrate wildlife (deer) for the purposes of hunting, trapping, or viewing.
Advantages
  • Camera surveys – Baiting is an effective method for conducting camera surveys which aid deer managers in determining densities, sex ratios, age structure, recruitment rates, and appropriate harvest rates.
  • Achieving Harvest Goals – Baiting can be a useful tool to aid deer managers in achieving harvest goals, particularly in urban and suburban areas with high densities and limited hunting opportunities.
  • Hunter Recruitment and Satisfaction – Baiting may increase the quantity of game viewed per hunt and therefore may enhance the hunting experience for some hunters.
  • Scientific Research – Baiting is a common technique used by wildlife professionals and researchers to trap and study deer.
Disadvantages
  • Disease – Baiting increases density around a single food source and therefore increases the potential for direct and indirect contact among individuals. Currently there are 12 deer diseases that are thought to be spread by direct contact, two of which are bovine tuberculosis and chronic wasting disease (CWD).
  • Habitat Impact – Studies have shown that baiting can decrease the home range size of deer and therefore can also negatively impact the surrounding native vegetation. Secondarily, many wildlife professionals believe that a reliance on baiting for hunting purposes may reduce native habitat management efforts.
  • Nocturnal Effect – Several studies have shown that baiting of deer increases nocturnal activity and decreases daytime activity.
  • Non-target Species – Scientific data shows that baiting for deer can negatively impact several non-target species, such as songbirds, game birds, and small mammals. Baiting can also increase predation at and around bait sites.
  • Artificial Increase in Carrying Capacity – Baiting can artificially increase a species carrying capacity. This problem is exacerbated when the bait is only available seasonally, especially in the fall (hunting season).
  • Fair Chase – The ethical battle concerning baiting as fair-chase hunting continues to divide both hunters and wildlife professionals.
Position: The NDA opposes the expansion of baiting where not currently legal. The NDA will not work to repeal baiting where currently legal, except where CWD (or other known diseases) is present. The NDA supports the use of baiting by wildlife professionals conducting scientific research. The NDA supports continued research on the effects on baiting in deer management programs.


Supplemental Feeding

The practice of supplemental feeding and its role in deer management have grown in terms of controversy and complexity in recent years. The NDA acknowledges the available scientific data surrounding this issue is incomplete and, at times, inconsistent. Therefore, the NDA has used the available scientific data and the experience of professional wildlife biologists in formulating the following position statement.
The NDA differentiates between baiting and supplemental feeding. Baiting is addressed in a separate Position Statement. The NDA defines supplemental feeding as the act of placing quality food resources for the purpose of increasing dietary quality.
Advantages
  • Agricultural Damage Avoidance – Supplemental feeding can reduce the impact on crop damage in agricultural areas.
  • Physiological Characteristics – Supplemental feeding during the growth season can have a positive impact on a variety of physiological characteristics in deer including increased body weights, improved nutritional condition of lactating does, more rapid growth rates for fawns, increased reproductive condition, and increased antler development. The primary growth season for the deer in the United States is April through August.
Disadvantages
  • Disease – Supplemental feeding increases density around a single food source and therefore increases the potential for direct and indirect contact among individuals. Currently there are 12 deer diseases that are thought to be spread by direct contact, two of which are bovine tuberculosis and chronic wasting disease (CWD).
  • Habitat Impact – Studies have shown that supplemental feeding can decrease the home range size of deer and negatively impact the surrounding native vegetation. Secondarily, many wildlife professionals believe that a reliance on supplemental feeding may reduce native habitat management efforts.
  • Migration Disturbance – In areas where deer exhibit migratory behavior, supplemental feeding can delay or prevent migratory patterns which can lead to starvation if supplemental feeding is discontinued.
  • Artificial Increase in Carrying Capacity – Supplemental feeding can artificially increase a species carrying capacity.
Position: The NDA supports providing adequate food and cover for deer through habitat management programs. The NDA does not support supplemental feeding in known CWD and bovine TB areas or where this activity may disrupt natural migratory patterns of deer.
 

svnmag

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2015
Posts
16,676
Likes
2,285
Points
773
Location
Here
^^^^I posted this to be on "your team". IMO it exposes/exhibits the generalities and ambiguousness of CWD.
 

PrairieGhost

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
May 15, 2015
Posts
10,289
Likes
615
Points
443
Location
Drifting the high plains
Shocking.................NOT!!! More lying by a govt agency to push their agenda and not what's best for the people. Who'd a thunk. Remember......."Trust the science"...which reads "Trust THEIR science."

When my son was interviewing for seminary one of the professors asked him what science says about creation. He told them " science doesn't say anything, people do". It's something for everyone to keep in mind. Science is a great tool that has solved many problems, but like everyone else scientists are corruptible. Every time a liberal administration hits Washington DC I would bet global change proposals quadruple. The easily corruptible know that if thier study supports the liberal agenda they will get more money. Im sure many seen me as a torn in their side.
 


Fritz the Cat

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Posts
5,001
Likes
537
Points
413
Lunk, read your article. Hunters must leave stuff in the field or use an approved processor for the meat they keep and an approved landfill for the parts they don't. Wear gloves while cutting it up.

Perhaps wear gloves while eating it. (spoofing)

They know when it is CWD because there are holes in the brain stem and or brain. The brain stem and spinal cord are mostly made up of cholesterol. The liver makes cholesterol "if" it has enough food minerals vitamins. Just saying.

To date, no one has been able to produce a microscopic slide of a prion. Let alone a misfolded prion. The NDGF attempted to produce some info. Turns out the pictures were an oxidized protein and some fibrils.
 

lunkerslayer

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Posts
18,870
Likes
2,862
Points
748
Location
Cavalier, ND
No I was referring to the part where it's not suggested to eat the meat from a contaminated deer. There has not been any cases of cwd passing to a human from consuming an infected deer. I always had the impression that mad cow disease was only possible if one was to eat the brain of an infected animal.
 

Fritz the Cat

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Posts
5,001
Likes
537
Points
413
Center for Disease Control

https://www.cdc.gov/prions/index.html

Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are a family of rare progressive neurodegenerative disorders that affect both humans and animals. They are distinguished by long incubation periods, characteristic spongiform changes associated with neuronal loss, and a failure to induce inflammatory response.

The causative agents of TSEs are believed to be prions. The term “prions” refers to abnormal, pathogenic agents that are transmissible and are able to induce abnormal folding of specific normal cellular proteins called prion proteins that are found most abundantly in the brain. The functions of these normal prion proteins are still not completely understood. The abnormal folding of the prion proteins leads to brain damage and the characteristic signs and symptoms of the disease. Prion diseases are usually rapidly progressive and always fatal.



National Insitute of Health 2014

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/detecting-human-prion-disease

Detecting Human Prion Disease​

At a Glance​

  • New tests can rapidly and accurately diagnose Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, an incurable and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder.
  • Early diagnoses of prion diseases could help prevent their spread and aid in the development of experimental treatments.
Brain tissue of a CJD patient
Sponge-like lesions in the brain tissue of a CJD patient.CDC
Prion diseases originate when, for reasons not fully understood, normally harmless prion proteins become abnormal, clump together, and accumulate in the brain. The diseases are characterized by sponge-like holes in brain tissue. They are notoriously difficult to diagnose, untreatable, and ultimately fatal.

Human prion diseases include sporadic, familial, and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Sporadic CJD is the most common, affecting an estimated 1 person per million worldwide each year. Sporadic CJD is caused by the spontaneous transformation of normal prions into abnormal ones. Other prion diseases include scrapie in sheep and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, in cattle.

Previously, a definitive CJD diagnosis could only be made by testing brain tissue after death or by biopsy in living patients. In the August 7, 2014, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers at NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and Italian colleagues described a less invasive test.

Dr. Gianluigi Zanusso and scientists at the University of Verona in Italy developed a way to collect olfactory neurons connected to the brain. The technique involves inserting a rigid fiber-optic rhinoscope into the patient’s nasal cavity. A sterile brush is then inserted alongside the scope. The brush is gently rolled along the mucosal surface to collect the neurons.

The scientists tested for the presence of prions using a technique called real-time quaking-induced conversion—or RT-QuIC. Dr. Byron Caughey’s group at NIAID, with collaborators at Nagasaki University, had previously developed the method to test cerebrospinal fluid for the presence of prions.

The researchers tested nasal samples from 31 people with sporadic CJD, 12 who had other neurologic diseases, and 31 with no neurologic disorder. The test correctly identified 30 of the 31 CJD patients (97% sensitivity) and correctly showed negative results for all 43 of the non-CJD patients (100% specificity). By comparison, tests using cerebral spinal fluid were 77% sensitive and 100% specific, and took twice as long to complete.

“This exciting advance, the culmination of decades of studies on prion diseases, markedly improves on available diagnostic tests for CJD that are less reliable, more difficult for patients to tolerate, and require more time to obtain results,” says NIAID Director Dr. Anthony S. Fauci. “With additional validation, this test has potential for use in clinical and agricultural settings.”

Another NIH-funded team, led by Dr. Claudio Soto of the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, developed a method for detecting prions in urine. They described the technique, called protein misfolding cyclic amplification, in an accompanying paper in the same journal. The test detected prions in 13 of 14 urine samples from patients with variant CJD—a type of CJD caused by exposure to BSE. The test didn’t detect prions in urine samples from healthy controls or from patients with other neurologic disorders, including sporadic or familial CJD. These results suggest that prions in urine are an exclusive feature of variant CJD.

The researchers will continue to develop and assess these tests in patients with CJD and other prion diseases.

th.jpg
 

svnmag

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2015
Posts
16,676
Likes
2,285
Points
773
Location
Here
We must be careful not to invalidate/marginalize or discourage prions:

 
Last edited:


lunkerslayer

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Posts
18,870
Likes
2,862
Points
748
Location
Cavalier, ND
https://www.trcp.org/chronic-wastin...SsHPV9IrC5JY-VLm9eLJprOhmP9FdiakaAqeGEALw_wcB
Until an actual case of prion tainted meat infects a human, speculation is mudding the waters to real scientific evidence.
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/mad-cow-disease-in-humans#in-humans
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Trusted Source note that there is strong evidence to link vCJD and mad cow disease. The evidence suggests that similar to BSE in cows, vCJD comes from eating food contaminated with the brain or spinal cord tissue of sick cattle. Which is also what happens when humans eat infected human brains of cannibalism.
 

lunkerslayer

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Posts
18,870
Likes
2,862
Points
748
Location
Cavalier, ND
Fun fact the pig of all animals does not have a brain destroying prion, which is the reason the brain is a delicacy to some ethnic groups.
 

Fritz the Cat

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
May 11, 2015
Posts
5,001
Likes
537
Points
413
https://www.trcp.org/chronic-wastin...SsHPV9IrC5JY-VLm9eLJprOhmP9FdiakaAqeGEALw_wcB
Until an actual case of prion tainted meat infects a human, speculation is mudding the waters to real scientific evidence.

Lunk, your source, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, the CEO or President is Whit Fosberg.
He also serves on the board of the National Deer Association, the other non-profit svmag got some info from.

Is it any wonder these non-profits always carry the same narrative.
 

lunkerslayer

Founding Member
Founding Member
Joined
Apr 12, 2015
Posts
18,870
Likes
2,862
Points
748
Location
Cavalier, ND
Lunk, your source, Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, the CEO or President is Whit Fosberg.
He also serves on the board of the National Deer Association, the other non-profit svmag got some info from.

Is it any wonder these non-profits always carry the same narrative.
Did you read my other link?
Science has known for sometime that the prions spread through brain and spinal cord tissue, that's how scientists were able to figure out how some cows got sick when others didn't. When feed lots would grind up dead calfs into their feed, the cows consumed the brain and spinal tissue where infected with the prions. So what is the common denominator here 🤔
 


Recent Posts

Friends of NDA

Top Posters of the Month

  • This month: 2
  • This month: 1
  • This month: 1
  • This month: 1
  • This month: 1
  • This month: 1
Top Bottom