zombie deer



Fritz the Cat

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All the credit goes to Dusty Backer and his wife Pat. They are avid hunters and believe in feeding the deer around their place. When Game and Fish had those info meetings back in the fall of 2022, Dusty didn't buy the "Best Management Practices" narrative.

He has done a lot of leg work visiting with Doctors, Pathologists, Veterinarians etc. from everywhere. This video is being shared inside and outside the State.
 

Retired Educator

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Would be interesting to hear someone who believes the converse of this man's research. In all my years of hunting deer (about 60 years), it has now become dangerous to feed deer just recently? Every year I observe deer yarding up. Sometimes hundreds of deer bunched together to feed and create trails to the feed. Now that is a problem.

Lately is seems that one of the big emphasis on solving this problem (not sure it's even a problem) is federal money. Create a problem so federal money comes in and allows you to solve a problem that doesn't exist.

Is there any evidence that contradicts this man's years of research and study. I recently read an article where a state was testing for CWD with a simple test such as a swab or the nose or something other that was just as simple. Testing was done on heads that were turned in. Forget the real numbers but a number of deer came back positive but when a more thorough test was done the number dropped way down. But in the report the number of positives from the first test did not go down. A main problem is "Are we creating a problem that does not exist so we can justify receiving more money?"

Interesting article.
 

luvcatchingbass

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Listened to this this morning and might have to go back and listen again when I'm not preoccupied. Normally I like what he has to say or willing to listen to his view points. I especially like the part early on where he talked about the "Dr" that is tied to the MN DNR, if its true it is complete BS and should go to show how trust worthy so many of these departments are.
(Everywhere) The list of trust worthy people and departments is so low it is sickening
 


Fritz the Cat

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Photo of a young woman sitting on a park bench while she ties the laces on her rewilding trainers

These slip on's fit over your favorite running shoes. The Europeans like them. The velcro design is for the jogger to run through the forest and transport seeds flora and fauna to other areas.

What if she steps in some poo?
 

Allen

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These slip on's fit over your favorite running shoes. The Europeans like them. The velcro design is for the jogger to run through the forest and transport seeds flora and fauna to other areas.

What if she steps in some poo?


That will transport too, trust me...I have seen it happen.
 

Fritz the Cat

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I don't like articles like this. Dr. Osterholme stood in front of the Minnesota legislature and said, "zombie deer disease." That went viral. It shook a lot of money loose from the general treasury.

This article depicts sportsmen in a negative way. The picture is of a fallow deer. If they got that wrong, then why is what they print right?

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/ot...o-human-crossover-raises-concerns/ar-BB1i7pcp

Fullscreen button


A deer with antlers peers through a bush

A deer with antlers peers through a bush© Provided by India Currents

Infectious disease threatens public health​

Each fall, millions of hunters across North America make their way into forests and grasslands to kill deer. Over the winter, people chow down on venison steaks, sausage, and burgers made from animals.

These hunters, however, are not just on the front lines of an American tradition. Infectious disease researchers say they are also on the front lines of what could be a serious threat to public health: chronic wasting disease.


The neurological disease, which is contagious, rapidly spreading, and always fatal, is caused by misfolded proteins called prions. It currently is known to infect only members of the cervid family — elk, deer, reindeer, caribou, and moose.

Spread of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)​

Animal disease scientists are alarmed about the rapid spread of CWD in deer. Recent research shows that the barrier to spillover into humans is less formidable than previously believed and that the prions causing the disease may be evolving to become more able to infect humans.

A response to the threat is ramping up. In 2023, a coalition of researchers began “working on a major initiative, bringing together 68 different global experts on various aspects of CWD to really look at what are the challenges ahead should we see a spillover into humans and food production,” said Michael Osterholm, an expert in infectious disease at the University of Minnesota and a leading authority on CWD.


“The bottom-line message is we are quite unprepared,” Osterholm said. “If we saw a spillover right now, we would be in free fall. There are no contingency plans for what to do or how to follow up.”

A potential outbreak​

The team of experts is planning for a potential outbreak, focusing on public health surveillance, lab capacity, prion disease diagnostics, surveillance of livestock and wildlife, risk communication, and education and outreach.

Despite the concern, tens of thousands of infected animals have been eaten by people in recent years, yet there have been no known human cases of the disease.

Many hunters have wrestled with how seriously to take the threat of CWD. “The predominant opinion I encounter is that no human being has gotten this disease,” said Steve Rinella, a writer and the founder of MeatEater, a media and lifestyle company focused on hunting and cooking wild game.


They think, “I am not going to worry about it because it hasn’t jumped the species barrier,” Rinella said. “That would change dramatically if a hunter got CWD.”
 

Allen

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Maybe I missed it, but I didn't see anywhere in the article that they called it a white-tailed deer? Are Fallow deer not subject to CWD?

FWIW, the article does nothing but state what is already known. CWD is a death sentence to the deer, and there is not yet any evidence it has crossed over to humans. But give that last possibility just a wee bit of thought, there is at least one other prion based disease (BSE) that has crossed over to humans. In the first outbreak of BSE in England, less than 200 people died from it and look at the scorched Earth policy that was used to bring it under control.

Now imagine what will happen to our deer population if CWD crosses over to people.
 

Average_NDA_Member

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Hmm nope I dunno if you watched the video but prions ain’t real nobodys ever seen one they ain’t transferable and nutrition cures it even if it did exist you heard the man he said he performed millions of chemistries well anyway I want to hunt by corn so discussion over libs I think the money grab needs to stop so no more research please n thank you
 


guywhofishes

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Maybe I missed it, but I didn't see anywhere in the article that they called it a white-tailed deer? Are Fallow deer not subject to CWD?

FWIW, the article does nothing but state what is already known. CWD is a death sentence to the deer, and there is not yet any evidence it has crossed over to humans. But give that last possibility just a wee bit of thought, there is at least one other prion based disease (BSE) that has crossed over to humans. In the first outbreak of BSE in England, less than 200 people died from it and look at the scorched Earth policy that was used to bring it under control.

Now imagine what will happen to our deer population if CWD crosses over to people.
BSE came to a screeching halt once they quit feeding cattle with bits/pieces of BSE infected cattle.

I wonder why CWD prions are thought to be tough and remain viable in the soil - yet BSE prions aren’t/didn’t.

Queer. Not? 🤓
 
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Fritz the Cat

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Maybe I missed it, but I didn't see anywhere in the article that they called it a white-tailed deer? Are Fallow deer not subject to CWD?

FWIW, the article does nothing but state what is already known. CWD is a death sentence to the deer, and there is not yet any evidence it has crossed over to humans. But give that last possibility just a wee bit of thought, there is at least one other prion based disease (BSE) that has crossed over to humans. In the first outbreak of BSE in England, less than 200 people died from it and look at the scorched Earth policy that was used to bring it under control.

Now imagine what will happen to our deer population if CWD crosses over to people.
Why do you always have to be, that guy?
 

Fritz the Cat

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Maybe I missed it, but I didn't see anywhere in the article that they called it a white-tailed deer? Are Fallow deer not subject to CWD?
We monitored a herd of fallow deer (Dama dama) for evidence of prion infection for 7 yr by periodic postmortem examination of animals from the herd. The fallow deer were exposed to the chronic wasting disease (CWD) agent from mule deer by living in a paddock considered contaminated with infectivity from its history of housing CWD infected deer and, after the first year of the study, by comingling with infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). At least 8 of 12 mule deer serving as sentinels for prion transmission and 25 additional mule deer serving as sources of infectivity developed clinical CWD or were otherwise confirmed to be infected with CWD via lymphoid tissue immunohistochemistry (IHC). In contrast, none of the 41 exposed fallow deer showed clinical signs suggestive of CWD, IHC staining of disease-associated prion in lymphoid or brain tissues, or evidence of spongiform degeneration in sections of brain stem at the level of the obex when sampled 18 mo to 7 yr after entering the mule deer paddock. The absence of clinical disease and negative IHC results in fallow deer housed in the same contaminated paddock for up to 7 yr and almost continuously exposed to CWD-infected mule deer for up to 6 yr suggests a species barrier or other form of resistance preventing fallow deer infection by the CWD agent or delaying progression of the disease in this species.

Allen, why do you always have to be, that guy.
 

Allen

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We monitored a herd of fallow deer (Dama dama) for evidence of prion infection for 7 yr by periodic postmortem examination of animals from the herd. The fallow deer were exposed to the chronic wasting disease (CWD) agent from mule deer by living in a paddock considered contaminated with infectivity from its history of housing CWD infected deer and, after the first year of the study, by comingling with infected mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). At least 8 of 12 mule deer serving as sentinels for prion transmission and 25 additional mule deer serving as sources of infectivity developed clinical CWD or were otherwise confirmed to be infected with CWD via lymphoid tissue immunohistochemistry (IHC). In contrast, none of the 41 exposed fallow deer showed clinical signs suggestive of CWD, IHC staining of disease-associated prion in lymphoid or brain tissues, or evidence of spongiform degeneration in sections of brain stem at the level of the obex when sampled 18 mo to 7 yr after entering the mule deer paddock. The absence of clinical disease and negative IHC results in fallow deer housed in the same contaminated paddock for up to 7 yr and almost continuously exposed to CWD-infected mule deer for up to 6 yr suggests a species barrier or other form of resistance preventing fallow deer infection by the CWD agent or delaying progression of the disease in this species.

Allen, why do you always have to be, that guy.

Because you could have just noted that Fallow deer are not a good representative photo of cervids known to be affected by CWD since there is at least some evidence to suggest they have at least some resistance to the disease. Instead, you used it to try and knock the actual content and principal investigator, rather than the MSN reporter who wrote the news article (not those who wrote whatever scholarly paper this was derived from).

Quite honestly, I'm also a little surprised you'd read MSN in the first place. As others have noted, you are rarely straight-forward with your agenda, and that often leaves those of us who read your posts with questions.

Do you know if there are other cervids with resistance to CWD? Serious question.

Edit: Fair read on efforts to breed in some resistance to CWD on a WT ranch.

https://www.bowhuntingmag.com/editorial/promising-new-CWD-research/476239
 
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Fritz the Cat

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Allen, here is another from USDA. Fallow deer do not get CWD.

https://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=247481

Because you could have just noted that Fallow deer are not a good representative photo of cervids known to be affected by CWD since there at least some evidence to suggest they have at least some resistance to the disease. Instead, you used it to try and knock the actual content and principal investigator, rather than the MSN reporter who wrote the news article (not those who wrote whatever scholarly paper this was derived from).
This whole prion theory needs taxpayer money. Fear and crisis's is the best way to stampede the populace.
As others have noted, you are rarely straight-forward with your agenda, and that often leaves those of us who read your posts with questions.
I don't know how more straight forward I need to be. All money to research zero money to monitoring. For the umpteenth time.

There has always been some money available for research. Mostly it has been the national deer growers getting that. The Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies has been trying for years to cash in on this crisis floating Bills for $60 million at a time for monitoring. In Wisconsin they wasted over $30 million trying to shoot every deer in a three county area. That failed. They did manage to lose 20 percent of their hunters.

Want to lose more hunters, print more articles like this one telling people it is maybe, possibly, could happen, if, just a matter of time CWD is going to jump the species barrier by eating the meat from animals they harvest.

You wouldn't try insinuate something that isn't real would you? Naaw you wouldn't do that. Never done it before. :ROFLMAO:
Shouldn't you be on nodakouthouse moderating that site into the ground?
 
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Fritz the Cat

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Edit: Fair read on efforts to breed in some resistance to CWD on a WT ranch.

https://www.bowhuntingmag.com/editorial/promising-new-CWD-research/476239
That is a fair article. Researchers are following the template of the scrapie program. They cut a snip out of the animals rectum testing for scrapie. A live test. DNA is taken and a sheep receives a score. Above condon 171 means the sheep is good to go and allowed to reproduce. Below condon 171 it goes to slaughter. At slaughter they do some random sampling and find about two per year.

This program may work in a captive cervid facility but obviously cannot work in the wild.

Some States find a case of CWD and get their hair on fire handing out more tags in that area or hiring sharpshooters to kill down the herd. How do they know they are not killing deer with a high resistance score?
 

Allen

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FWIW, monitoring = data collection.

It's very difficult to do a good job of sciencing if one doesn't have data. There's a book out there named Freakonomics (actually it's a series of 3 books, last I checked). It's a great example of what a scientist (economist) did with seemingly random, weird, and useless sets of data that others collected. Well worth the few bucks for a quality read.

Freakonomics.

Book overview:

Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool? What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? Why do drug dealers still live with their moms? How much do parents really matter? What kind of impact did Roe v. Wade have on violent crime?
These may not sound like typical questions for an economist to ask. But Steven D. Levitt is not a typical economist. He is a much heralded scholar who studies the stuff and riddles of everyday life-;from cheating and crime to sports and child rearing-;and whose conclusions regularly turn the conventional wisdom on its head. He usually begins with a mountain of data and a simple, unasked question. Some of these questions concern life-and-death issues; others have an admittedly freakish quality. Thus the new field of study contained in this book: freakonomics.
Through forceful storytelling and wry insight, Levitt and co-author Stephen J. Dubner show that economics is, at root, the study of incentives-;how people get what they want, or need, especially when other people want or need the same thing. In Freakonomics, they set out to explore the hidden side of ... well, everything. The inner workings of a crack gang. The truth about real-estate agents. The myths of campaign finance. The telltale marks of a cheating schoolteacher. The secrets of the Ku Klux Klan.
What unites all these stories is a belief that the modern world, despite a surfeit of obfuscation, complication, and downright deceit, is not impenetrable, is not unknowable, and-;if the right questions are asked-;is even more intriguing than we think. All it takes is a new way of looking. Steven Levitt, through devilishly clever and clear-eyed thinking, shows how to see through all the clutter.
Freakonomics establishes this unconventional premise: If morality represents how we would like the world to work, then economics represents how it actually does work. It is true that readers of this book will be armed with enough riddles and stories to last a thousand cocktail parties. But Freakonomics can provide more than that. It will literally redefine the way we view the modern world.
Read less
 
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Average_NDA_Member

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Hmmm nope we don’t need no game n fish libs getting more of our tax money just to study and say I can’t hunt corn I think fritz the cat is right we need to let the deer farmers get the grant money that way the research is done in private where we can get the results we want with no monitoring the wild deer we actually hunt that would be useless info ok fritz the cat what time can me and the fellas show up for some pheasants
 


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