Driveway replacement

JUSTWINGNIT

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Hey guys, I live out in the country and had about 1/3 of my asphalt driveway break up this winter due to shitty installation at the time before i bought this place. Anyways anybody have a good reputable contractor for complete tear out, new base and installation? Also not sure of price differences between concrete vs. asphalt these days. Rough estimate of 5000 sq ft. I did get a quote of 30,000 for asphalt a few years back, which I thought was damn high.. THANKS!!
 


mikef

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One thing about asphalt, is it should be sealed regularly, and that is not cheap. Please post the cost comparison once you get it all figured out
 

JUSTWINGNIT

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One thing about asphalt, is it should be sealed regularly, and that is not cheap. Please post the cost comparison once you get it all figured out
For sure. i am thinking about diving into the crack seal business and possibly sealcoating because of this cost. Holy hell it aint cheap! I would rather have concrete but same song and dance minus the upkeep.
 

Obi-Wan

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For sure. i am thinking about diving into the crack seal business and possibly sealcoating because of this cost. Holy hell it aint cheap! I would rather have concrete but same song and dance minus the upkeep.
You do know how to make a small fortune in the contracting business don’t you ?
 


wslayer

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I did check into asphalt a few yrs ago $$$. I am sick of shooting 3/4" rocks around with the snow blower. If I remember correctly, it was about $6k for material for approx. 40x80. Prep work and actually laying is at least double that. Not sure what re-sealing costs would be.
 

Kurtr

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Hey guys, I live out in the country and had about 1/3 of my asphalt driveway break up this winter due to shitty installation at the time before i bought this place. Anyways anybody have a good reputable contractor for complete tear out, new base and installation? Also not sure of price differences between concrete vs. asphalt these days. Rough estimate of 5000 sq ft. I did get a quote of 30,000 for asphalt a few years back, which I thought was damn high.. THANKS!!

Just did a quick figure and 30k seems about right for 4"'s of asphalt and prep. In dealing with both i would rather have concrete for driveways as long term you will have way less maintenance and it will hold up longer just dont be spreading the damn salt all over.
 

Obi-Wan

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On old concrete guy i know had a rule that he would charge 2 1/2 to 3 times the cost of the concrete for a project. I can tell you that in Washburn 4000 psi redi mix costs $ 175.00 yd. 5000 sq ft would require roughly 80 yds with waste so the concrete with tax would be just short of $ 15,000. using this old guys method his price would run around $ 37,500 to $ 45,000. ( 7.50 to 9.00 sq ft ) now throw in some fiber mesh or rebar and the cost goes up. I believe this is on the high side but it is not my method.
 

johnr

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Just did a quick figure and 30k seems about right for 4"'s of asphalt and prep. In dealing with both i would rather have concrete for driveways as long term you will have way less maintenance and it will hold up longer just dont be spreading the damn salt all over.
And make sure the concrete guy uses rebar, and puts a 4 inch or more slab down.
Sometimes you get a company that says you don't need the rebar, that is wrong.
 

BrokenBackJack

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I agree with JR above. I can't believe the people that pour concrete and say they don't need rebar. That is the cheapest part of the job.
 


zoops

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On old concrete guy i know had a rule that he would charge 2 1/2 to 3 times the cost of the concrete for a project. I can tell you that in Washburn 4000 psi redi mix costs $ 175.00 yd. 5000 sq ft would require roughly 80 yds with waste so the concrete with tax would be just short of $ 15,000. using this old guys method his price would run around $ 37,500 to $ 45,000. ( 7.50 to 9.00 sq ft ) now throw in some fiber mesh or rebar and the cost goes up. I believe this is on the high side but it is not my method.
From strata in Bismarck last June...
1713364783203.png
 

Rowdie

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The only thing I don't like about the millings is they don't snow blow worth a shit. I was thinking of having oil put on them. They may be re-doing the HWY by my place and was wondering what it might cost for them to spray a little oil on top of the millings. One lane 200 yds with a little parking area. They may have to pack it after IDK. Anyone know what that would cost?
 

Kurtr

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The only thing I don't like about the millings is they don't snow blow worth a shit. I was thinking of having oil put on them. They may be re-doing the HWY by my place and was wondering what it might cost for them to spray a little oil on top of the millings. One lane 200 yds with a little parking area. They may have to pack it after IDK. Anyone know what that would cost?
You would need prime oil. Chip seal oil or tack would make a mess
 

Kurtr

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And make sure the concrete guy uses rebar, and puts a 4 inch or more slab down.
Sometimes you get a company that says you don't need the rebar, that is wrong.
In general i would agree but we have been doing stuff with structural fiber that has held up really good.
 

Rowdie

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You would need prime oil. Chip seal oil or tack would make a mess
THANKS! This is out of my range of knowledge. But I sure like the millings, they're way better than gravel. I'm sure glad the tribe had a bunch they wanted to burn up. Pumpkin (nickname of the guy) put them on thick and did a great job on it. I fed him lunch all week and let him dig pops out my cooler whenever he wanted, and now we're really happy with it. It's all gumbo out there so driving on it wet before was insane. Now I just smile.
 


Obi-Wan

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And make sure the concrete guy uses rebar, and puts a 4 inch or more slab down.
Sometimes you get a company that says you don't need the rebar, that is wrong.
In the country I would go with 5" if you have septic trucks, propane trucks, or other heavy vehicles
utilizing the driveway.

I would also go with Fiberglass bar which is roughly 60% cost of steel bar

Fiberglass vs. Steel Rebar: Which is Best for Structural Reinforcements?​

Structural reinforcements are imperative for the overall strength and longevity of concrete-based structural applications such as bridge decks, parking garages and drainage systems. Reinforcements are indispensable for retrofitting existing structures while being more cost-effective than rebuilding them, especially in terms of increasing the load-bearing capacity of the original structure. Traditionally, the structural industry has used steel to produce structural reinforcements.
This blog post will highlight the shortcomings of steel-based reinforcements and why fiberglass is the best structural reinforcement material today.
Steel rebars
Steel rebars, short for reinforcement bars, are traditional structural reinforcements typically used for reinforcing cement concrete. Concrete is strong under compressive loads but weak under tensile loads. Steel rebars hold the concrete together and enhance the tensile strength of concrete-based structures while preventing cracks in structural components during tensile loading. Steel was used in rebars primarily because its thermal expansion is similar to concrete.
Unfortunately, steels are highly reactive. Steel slowly starts corroding as concrete comes in contact with oxygen, chlorides and moisture. Corrosion eats up steel and compromises the strength of structural reinforcements, making them failure-prone. Over time, rust accumulates on steel bars and builds up pressure on the surrounding concrete, leading to cracks that can eventually fracture concrete via spalling. These failures are costly to repair and maintain. Moreover, steel rebars are susceptible to melting at increased temperatures, are excessively heavy and are expensive to install.
Fiberglass - The Future of Structural Reinforcements
Fiberglass, aka fiberglass-reinforced polymers, is a composite material containing a polymer resin matrix reinforced by embedded glass fibers. They are easy to fabricate and are manufactured via pultrusion.
Fiberglass overcomes the main shortcomings of steel rebars and is unquestionably the modern go-to material for structural reinforcements. Fiberglass fabrics are lightweight with a high strength-to-weight ratio, flexural strength and stiffness. Fiberglass is roughly 75-80% lighter than steel and yet possesses higher strength and requires less installation time and labor.
Less weight is thus added to the reinforced structures, enhancing their performance. Fiberglass is easily transformed into complex shapes, offering higher flexibility for custom applications. Unlike steels, fiberglass is highly chemically resistant, especially to corrosion. The interwoven structure of fiberglass makes structural reinforcements impervious to water and other corrosive and alkaline environments. Fiberglass reinforcements require minimal maintenance and have low lifecycle costs. Fiberglass is electrically non-conductive and therefore ensures personnel safety.
 

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