Garden!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Kurtr

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Same thing I was thinking.
between the bees, the Mexican vanilla, and now the berry patch, this fucking fella is gonna be set.
Don't forget the fish slurry fertilizer ordeal, probably be the best berry, honey, vanilla ordeal of all time.
cant forget about the water softner salt mass pickling idea also.
 


Wall-eyes

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You guys sure are masters at the gardening and finish product never heard of some of these ideas. I have a friend who was an alky for 25 years he quite now and grows garden to feed the world. I sure do enjoy alot of his great recipes my goodness yummy. He has a crazy setup like 5,000 or 10,000 gallon water tank to store water. Nicest guy around he really changed his life.
 


CAH

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Started peppers, tomatoes, cauliflower and broccoli tonight. I think it is a bit early but the wife is jonesin to get going so here we are.
 

Freedom

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Started peppers, tomatoes, cauliflower and broccoli tonight. I think it is a bit early but the wife is jonesin to get going so here we are.
Bit early on the tomatoes imo but you can always plant them deep if they get leggy.
 

BDub

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Bit early on the tomatoes imo but you can always plant them deep if they get leggy.
There are problems with leggy tomatoes. If you bury them deep most likely the soil will be cold and that will slow down growth. I bought some once and they are hard to plant sideways as they are somewhat brittle. They break easily plus the wind isn't kind to them. I've raised several hundred tomatoes and managed to screw up every possible way. Bottom line planting stout plants with a good root ball deep in warm soil is a winner. Start them in April.
 


KDM

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Going to put together another 8 raised garden beds. Each will be 4X8 and 40 inches tall. I built 4 of them a couple years ago and boy do I like NOT having to bend over or crawl on the ground to weed. I can just crack a beer, lean on the side, and pick away in comfort and style. Easier to harvest as well. Picking green beans isn't a royal PITA anymore. Same beer and lean method. Mo Betta!!!!!
 

johnr

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Going to put together another 8 raised garden beds. Each will be 4X8 and 40 inches tall. I built 4 of them a couple years ago and boy do I like NOT having to bend over or crawl on the ground to weed. I can just crack a beer, lean on the side, and pick away in comfort and style. Easier to harvest as well. Picking green beans isn't a royal PITA anymore. Same beer and lean method. Mo Betta!!!!!
I am looking at putting in one or two this spring. Do you fill the entirety with soil? or is there a bottom of sorts and you are only using the top portion of the raised bed?
 

Fly Carpin

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I am looking at putting in one or two this spring. Do you fill the entirety with soil? or is there a bottom of sorts and you are only using the top portion of the raised bed?
Wife and I have 5 beds and counting, all 4x8 and about 30 inches deep. Realized real quick that it takes a LOT of expensive dirt to fill it. Now we do something similar to this:
garden_bed_filler.jpg
 

KDM

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I try to fill the bottom with something besides black dirt. I like to use junk wood if I can find it like cottonwood, boxelder, willow, etc. Anything but pine. If I can't get that, I'll use whatever decomposable material I can find such as square bales, brush from tree trimming and the like. If I were in town I would go look at the recycle place for branches and other woody residue. I don't like leaves and lawn clippings as they break down to fast and there are chemicals in the grass clippings I don't want my veggies in. For me out here in the sticks, after the wood, I like to fill the bottom with composted manure from the neighbors cattle. The price is right and I can get as much as I want. I leave the bottom of the bed in direct contact with the ground. That way worms and other necessary critters can find there way into the bed to do their thing. Good Luck!!
 
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Auggie

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I am looking at putting in one or two this spring. Do you fill the entirety with soil? or is there a bottom of sorts and you are only using the top portion of the raised bed?
Some gravel or old concrete blocks placed at the bottom and a few small holes will help with drainage. For a topsoil mix, I go 1/3 compost, 1/3 peat moss, and 1/3 top soil. You won't have to fertilize for a while as the compost and peat moss will provide fertilizer. After a few years, I add more compost or raw manure. It adds fertilizer and allows you to to the lake for a few days, fish, and not worry about the garden drying up.
 


johnr

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Some gravel or old concrete blocks placed at the bottom and a few small holes will help with drainage. For a topsoil mix, I go 1/3 compost, 1/3 peat moss, and 1/3 top soil. You won't have to fertilize for a while as the compost and peat moss will provide fertilizer. After a few years, I add more compost or raw manure. It adds fertilizer and allows you to to the lake for a few days, fish, and not worry about the garden drying up.
Did you put your name in for a spot?
 

BDub

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Lots of good information here. There are some drawbacks. They need lots of water. I put a board across mine and set a small sprinkler on it. Then water. Also they can raise tomatoes up into the wind. I use my raised beds as wind barriers. Cucumbers love them!
 

CAH

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If my tomatoes get leggy I just dig the hole deeper and at an angle. They grow up straight and those little hairs on the stem are actually roots so those grow and I think they get a better root system.
 

Davey Crockett

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Good to be thinking about outdoor gardening again .

My indoor tent garden was fun but not cost effective, We ate a lot of salad out of it but salad is the cheapest food you can buy . Cucumber was my main crop but an undetected heat malfunction ruined my crop just when the plants started developing cucumbers and they never came out of it. Cukes don't like cold but the salads thrived. Harvested the salad and shut it down , the only thing different for next winter is figure out a warmer spot.
 


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