Garden!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Freedom

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I started around 100 peppers Tuesday, planning around 200 plants total. Most get given away. Last year I did some SIP buckets, they seemed to work well for peppers really seemed to cut back on how often I needed to water.
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KDM

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We forayed into bucket gardening for the first time last summer. Peppers grew like wildfire in the buckets. We did learn that the buckets need to be in direct contact with the ground. We had dozens of buckets on our deck and ALL of them overheated and the plants were embarrassingly dismal and produced absolutely NOTHING. The buckets that were on the ground did great. Peas, Peppers, and beans on the ground were crazy good. We will be doing that again for sure.
 

CatDaddy

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We forayed into bucket gardening for the first time last summer. Peppers grew like wildfire in the buckets. We did learn that the buckets need to be in direct contact with the ground. We had dozens of buckets on our deck and ALL of them overheated and the plants were embarrassingly dismal and produced absolutely NOTHING. The buckets that were on the ground did great. Peas, Peppers, and beans on the ground were crazy good. We will be doing that again for sure.
Care to share your setup? Just buckets with weep holes or more complex than that?
 

KDM

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That's pretty much it Bud. Popped some holes about an inch above the bottom to leave a reservoir of water and set them on the ground. I'm pretty sure some of those pepper plants whispered "feed me Seymour" as you walked by.
 

Davey Crockett

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Another option is grow bags , we use them for all our deck garden ' I like putting them on wheels so I can pull them in the garage if we get a bad storm or hot day pull them into shade. They make all sizes , about a buck each for 3 gal . just have plastic with berm of some type so you can get an inch or two of water.



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LBrandt

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Now if you are lucky enough to know a rancher or two they feed their cows mineral out of large orange tubs that are really heavy duty. I am bring in 25 to 30 this spring. You can raise just about anything in them and the sun dont kill them like white buckets. I raised large candy onions in some last year and they grew quite well with some over a # and a half. Wonderful for onion rings. LB
 

BDub

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Now if you are lucky enough to know a rancher or two they feed their cows mineral out of large orange tubs that are really heavy duty. I am bring in 25 to 30 this spring. You can raise just about anything in them and the sun dont kill them like white buckets. I raised large candy onions in some last year and they grew quite well with some over a # and a half. Wonderful for onion rings. LB
How do you get those onions so big? It’s hit and miss with Missouri River bottom soil.
 

LBrandt

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I have a really sandy loam soil and I plant onion plants that are called CANDY HYBRIDs, not bulbs but real plants. Usually sold at garden centers in bunches of anywhere from 40 to 80 per bunch. If you want to know exactly how give me a PM. LB
 

BDub

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I have a really sandy loam soil and I plant onion plants that are called CANDY HYBRIDs, not bulbs but real plants. Usually sold at garden centers in bunches of anywhere from 40 to 80 per bunch. If you want to know exactly how give me a PM. LB
I’m fairly certain that the soil helps. That sandy loam is better for growing lots of things. I was told long ago that I needed river bottom sand to loosen my soil. Probably 25 years ago I purchased some soil that has a good amount of sand in it. It grows flowers like crazy. Also the best crop of sweet potatoes ever. But it was a one shot deal.
 

Freedom

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I see Lbrandt mentioned candy hybrids any other favorite onion varieties? Also curious about some high yielding potato varieties
 


Lycanthrope

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I see Lbrandt mentioned candy hybrids any other favorite onion varieties? Also curious about some high yielding potato varieties
I like copra and redwing, they both store a while and are oniony tasting, some of the really sweet ones are too sweet imo. Same with sweet corn.
 

LBrandt

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Getting a lot of plants started. Tomatoes and peppers and a lot of flowers to attract what few bees we get. not to many honey bees but a lot of bumble bee's. Feels good to be doing something again. After all that radiation this winter its been a tough row to hoe to get going again. This old cats running out of his 9 lives. LB
 

CAH

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Does anybody here use wood chips for mulch? Seems like an interesting idea I would like to try. I also want to try the no-dig method of gardening.

In a week or so I am starting with a bare patch of grass and am looking for ideas on how to start a garden plot for this summer.
 

Lycanthrope

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Does anybody here use wood chips for mulch? Seems like an interesting idea I would like to try. I also want to try the no-dig method of gardening.

In a week or so I am starting with a bare patch of grass and am looking for ideas on how to start a garden plot for this summer.
Wood chips are good generally, I use them a lot. They will suck nitrogen out of the soil though so you need to give a little extra. If you have grass, Id kill the grass, then put a couple inches of composted manure on top and then till it all in. Some people dont like roundup so there are other options. You can put down plastic to kill whatever is under it, but that takes a lot longer. if you till up live grass, youll have grass coming up in your garden forever.
 
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CAH

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Wood chips are good generally, I use them a lot. They will suck nitrogen out of the soil though so you need to give a little extra. If you have grass, Id kill the grass, then put a couple inches of composted manure on top and then till it all in. Some people dont like roundup so there are other options. You can put down plastic to kill whatever is under it, but that takes a lot longer.
Where can a guy get compost around that doesnt have chemicals in it? How would you kill the grass? I was thinking silage tarp for a few weeks here through May.
 


Lycanthrope

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Where can a guy get compost around that doesnt have chemicals in it? How would you kill the grass? I was thinking silage tarp for a few weeks here through May.
Compost is hard to find, ive had good luck with city compost, and also ive had it kill plants, so thats a risky option. Easier to find a cattle farmer with a feed lot, often you can get some manure from them cheap or free. check bisman or marketplace and you might find someone selling or giving it away. If you get manure, get stuff thats old, not fresh or youll have issues. best manure pile has been setting for quite a few years and has plants growing on top of it.
 

Lycanthrope

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Another option is grow bags , we use them for all our deck garden ' I like putting them on wheels so I can pull them in the garage if we get a bad storm or hot day pull them into shade. They make all sizes , about a buck each for 3 gal . just have plastic with berm of some type so you can get an inch or two of water.



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Grow bags directly on the soil can work well also, they tend to dry out a little faster, ive also used grow bags set into a hole so about 1/3 of them is buried, roots will grow right through into the soil as the plants get bigger. Peppers dont like cold ground, and they also like it dry, so they are probably about ideal for grow bags that will heat up in the sun and also dry out faster.
 
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Davey Crockett

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Grow bags directly on the soil can work well also, they tend to dry out a little faster, ive also used grow bags set into a hole so about 1/3 of them is buried, roots will grow right through into the soil as the plants get bigger. Peppers dont like cold ground, and they also like it dry, so they are probably about ideal for grow bags that will heat up in the sun and also dry out faster.
I made a spot for grow bags by laying 50' of drip line on flat hard ground and wet it then drove my tractor where I wanted my grow bags, it sunk in just enough to made a perfect shallow trench that I filled it with grow bags and put the drip line back in. That works like a charm.
Does anybody here use wood chips for mulch? Seems like an interesting idea I would like to try. I also want to try the no-dig method of gardening.

In a week or so I am starting with a bare patch of grass and am looking for ideas on how to start a garden plot for this summer.
I'd consider covering the garden spot you want and set grow bags on the cover and leave spot covered during the hot months of summer and till it in the fall . By the end of august every weed big enough to die will be dead then you have all fall to work it up good. FWIW , Iv'e never had much luck planting first year garden spots but soil type has lot to do with it , we have heavy clay up here . For mulch I use straw since It's readily available .
 

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