Oahe Zebras

Lycanthrope

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Those Brainiac's who think more restrictions will stop ANS are likely the same geniuses who think more restrictive gun laws would stop murder...
 


Allen

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sounds like some liberal environmental BS there is enuf articles out there that show the mussels = good plus they are probably lt tasty don’t even get me started on fish and wildlife and their trailers of mountain lions

Do tell! I don't think I know anyone that has eaten either a zebra or quagga mussel.

Also, I must hear more on the trailers of mountain lions.
 

Greenhorn

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Zebras don’t like sand. They prefer rock and gravel, which is why they thrive in lakes like Mille lacs. I think the MO river system will be just fine
 
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Do tell! I don't think I know anyone that has eaten either a zebra or quagga mussel.

Also, I must hear more on the trailers of mountain lions.
Haven’t tried it either but fried in butter or duck fat they should be just fine plus you if you believe the liberal hippy nonsense you might save a fish or two so win win.

Common nowlidge that the game wardens took federal monies and spread lions to North Dakota transporting them in trailers wolves and bears will be next mark my words so I wouldn’t be surprised if they did the same with trailers full of zebra mussels matter of fact there’s hundreds of studies and reports out there on this it’s actually 100% fact
 

ORCUS DEMENS

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Eyexer, The lake was on the mend long before zebras and quaggas showed up. They did make the water clearer, not necessarily cleaner. The downside is they feed heavily on small invertebrates that are also the same food source for small fish. Stone Labs has some great information on their impacts on ecosystems.
 


eyexer

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Eyexer, The lake was on the mend long before zebras and quaggas showed up. They did make the water clearer, not necessarily cleaner. The downside is they feed heavily on small invertebrates that are also the same food source for small fish. Stone Labs has some great information on their impacts on ecosystems.
If you talk to people that have fished the Great Lakes forever you’ll hear the Zebs made the Great Lakes what they are today. Of course they had improved some when the epa forced cities to quit dumping sewage into the lake. But the zebs later showed up and made fishing explode. They’ve never been the big boogie man they’re always made out to be. That’s mostly been used to secure more dollars and create more jobs.
 

Traxion

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Curious to see how zeebs will affect the power generation facilities. Water intakes are aplenty too.

From a fishing standpoint they can’t say I’m thrilled. Seeing the bottom clear as day is 25’ of water on Green Bay and not being able to let anything touch bottom sucked. Boards and way away from the boat was the only way to catch fish. I’d prefer in the prop wash on a 50 lead personally!
 

Kurtr

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Curious to see how zeebs will affect the power generation facilities. Water intakes are aplenty too.

From a fishing standpoint they can’t say I’m thrilled. Seeing the bottom clear as day is 25’ of water on Green Bay and not being able to let anything touch bottom sucked. Boards and way away from the boat was the only way to catch fish. I’d prefer in the prop wash on a 50 lead personally!
I asked my engineer friend who is working on the new water plant about that. They have a pump that puts some kind of epoxy on them at the in takes and the suffocate and die. I guess it does it periodically and they have installed on most infrastructure with the assumption that the zebras were coming
 

Allen

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I asked my engineer friend who is working on the new water plant about that. They have a pump that puts some kind of epoxy on them at the in takes and the suffocate and die. I guess it does it periodically and they have installed on most infrastructure with the assumption that the zebras were coming
This is true. The Corps has also taken preventative steps to lessen the impacts of mussels on the Missouri R. mainstem dams.

It is also true that this and the expected continuation of cleaning mussels off of important dam features is costing many millions of dollars per year going forward. Unless you are OK with dam gates that don't function.
If you talk to people that have fished the Great Lakes forever you’ll hear the Zebs made the Great Lakes what they are today. Of course they had improved some when the epa forced cities to quit dumping sewage into the lake. But the zebs later showed up and made fishing explode. They’ve never been the big boogie man they’re always made out to be. That’s mostly been used to secure more dollars and create more jobs.

Of course, mussels (and other invasives) have helped defined what the Great Lakes fisheries are today, they are already present in great enough numbers to affect the ecosystem. The real question is "is it better today than it would have been without the little bastards"? One could argue for days if the invasives or the EPA had a more beneficial impact on the water quality. As far as fishing, I am reasonably sure the practices and policies of various state and federal agencies over the years would also be important in this discussion.
 

shorthairsrus

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The lake i am on just got em in 2 years ago. They went upstream in a culvert. DNR says 2 years but it could be longer imo. Culvert is in my bay but i have none on my lift. Yet a mile away they have them on rocks and lifts. So its wierd or they came in a different way.

The water has cleared. Impact imo --- positive for fishing to begin with. The bottom constists of alot of moss weeds etc in certain areas. Those weeds luv the clear water and sunshine so if anything they have grown. Sight fishing - yes but the fish can see you now much better too. I am going to give it a thumbs up for now. We will have to see into the future.

The lake on the other side of the culvert which i am sure many of you know. That is water is as clear as the water around cozumel. Awesome night lake; always has been that way. I fished it this fall and strugggled as i could see my bait at 20 25 feet down. The fall tourney though imo bigger fish than in the past and people didnt struggle to get them.

Ultimately where do i think they are coming from the big surf boats 75% at fault.
 


eyexer

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This is true. The Corps has also taken preventative steps to lessen the impacts of mussels on the Missouri R. mainstem dams.

It is also true that this and the expected continuation of cleaning mussels off of important dam features is costing many millions of dollars per year going forward. Unless you are OK with dam gates that don't function.


Of course, mussels (and other invasives) have helped defined what the Great Lakes fisheries are today, they are already present in great enough numbers to affect the ecosystem. The real question is "is it better today than it would have been without the little bastards"? One could argue for days if the invasives or the EPA had a more beneficial impact on the water quality. As far as fishing, I am reasonably sure the practices and policies of various state and federal agencies over the years would also be important in this discussion.
Lots of variables for sure. But they haven’t been the big problem that was predicted
 

Allen

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Lots of variables for sure. But they haven’t been the big problem that was predicted

I know more than a few that would disagree.

I found a publication that looked at both the spiny water flea and zebra mussels, for whatever reason they seem to go hand in hand. The study was done on a number of Minnesota lakes and in general found walleye growth rates were below normal for their first year, but perch seemed to better tolerate the fleas and mussels. As they put it in the article, decreased size is important when your risk of being eaten is at least partially based on your size.

They also mention Lake Oneida in New York lost 50% of the total walleye biomass after being infested with zebra mussels. That's a pretty big hit!

Here's the link to the article: https://www.usgs.gov/publications/w...lowing-zebra-mussel-and-bythotrephes-invasion
 
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now Allen tell ya what this is soundin an awful lot like book learnin and covid 19 talk so best provide some REAL evidence and by that i mean something that i agree with next yer gonna tell me to dock the tail of my pup aint gonna happen
 

eyexer

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I know more than a few that would disagree.

I found a publication that looked at both the spiny water flea and zebra mussels, for whatever reason they seem to go hand in hand. The study was done on a number of Minnesota lakes and in general found walleye growth rates were below normal for their first year, but perch seemed to better tolerate the fleas and mussels. As they put it in the article, decreased size is important when your risk of being eaten is at least partially based on your size.

They also mention Lake Oneida in New York lost 50% of the total walleye biomass after being infested with zebra mussels. That's a pretty big hit!

Here's the link to the article: https://www.usgs.gov/publications/w...lowing-zebra-mussel-and-bythotrephes-invasion
Yea it really shrunk the Great Lakes eyes
 

Allen

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now Allen tell ya what this is soundin an awful lot like book learnin and covid 19 talk so best provide some REAL evidence and by that i mean something that i agree with next yer gonna tell me to dock the tail of my pup aint gonna happen
You can call it "book learning" if you want since it is now published, but in reality it was a group of guys who went out and measured some 50,000 walleye to collect the data, document the differences from earlier studies on walleye growth rates in those lakes, and then write it all up so we don't have to reinvent the wheel.
 


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hmmm nope don't trust the science whats to say this group of guys aint a bunch of liberals whats lookin for my tax dollars
 

shorthairsrus

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Zebras:

1. the one that called off side on Kansas City --- i slap that zebra on the back thank you sir!!! can KC have another.

2. Crank Baits -- i lead core had a great night of waldos-- no issues with zebs.

3. Bottom bouncer before sundown - had a good bite going - but caught zebras they would hang onto the moss at the bottom and the hook would catch the lead zebra and pull up the moss which had up to 5 zebras on a 4 inch section of moss. So pain in the ass to pull bouncers.
 

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