What's in your garden?

NPO_Aaron

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I've always made a big deal out of knowing the sources of the meat I eat, but then I would go pick the rest of my meal off the shelf at the store. This year I am looking forward to having the majority of my meals come from my game freezer and my garden. I am a salsa guy, so most of the garden is taken up by tomatoes and different varieties of peppers. We also grow peas, carrots, cucumbers, zucchini, spaghetti squash, brussel sprouts, corn and since my wife doubted me, watermelon. To give it all a nice boost, I fertilize with a ground up fish remainder/water mixture.
 


KDM

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We have potatoes in the ground right now. The rest will get planted this week. Good Luck with your garden and may your weeds be small and not thistles. LOL!!
 

Srputz

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Potatoes, corn, peas, green beans, carrots, beets, tomatoes, cucumbers,banana peppers, green peppers, pumpkins, and cantaloupe.
Now the work begins keeping the weeds out
 

BDub

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So far two varieties of potatoes, three types of onions, asparagus - doing well, two varieties of corn, flat pole beans, five varieties of squash, peas, radishes, swiss chard, spinach. Melons, cucumbers, more corn, more swiss chard, 20 tomato plants, pepper's, zucchini, watermelon and pumpkins to go in soon. Powered by Neptune's Harvest fish fertilizer from Johnny's Seeds. Oh I forgot cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, garlic, sweet potatoes and lots of carrots.

For now.
 


Davey Crockett

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Everything in except for the transplants , my Tomato and melons and other stuff died peacefully in their sleep at the hands of Jack Frost. The electric heater failed in my little makeshift greenhouse and jack got in.
 

Trapper62

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Onions and potatoes have been in for a while, planted all peppers and tomatoes this week, rest in today. For you cucumber growers, here is how I grew mine on a trellis last year and it really saved on space, most off of the ground and the north side stayed moist all summer. This 16' row produced over 500 cucumbers. Once they grow, start them up the trellis and they keep going up, mine went about 6" above the top. Going to plant cantelope the same way this year, it really took a lot les space.
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spyder250

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We started using preen(weed preventer), two years ago and it makes one heck of a difference! you have to wait to apply until all of your plants are 2 inches tall, but once you put it down you just have to do minor maintenance weeding. Works wonders.
 

huntorride365

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I'm planning on putting carrots on the south side of the garage. A whole bunch of carrots; enough to last through the winter. Will they keep in the soil if I cover them with leaves this winter? (keep in mind they are on the sun facing south side, I am in Mobridge, so it's a long ways from Fargo and Grand Forks kind of cold)
 


BDub

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A bale of straw works good. Cover them good and you should be eating carrots.
 

Ristorapper

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We've put in just tomatoes and cucumbers. Like the idea of the trellis trapper. how are they held up??

huntorride you can stick a thermometer in the ground and leave them in the ground as long as the ground does not freeze. Father-in-law would always harvest them then and use one or two gallon freezer bags and keep them in root cellar or fridge and use as needed. Last a long time if you can keep the moisture out of the bags. When the bags appear to be wet inside we remove the carrots, wipe the moisture out and replace the carrots back into the fridge. Or what we did this year is put several paper towels in with the carrots and removed them when soaked. Put in another couple of sheets of paper towels and replace in the fridge. And my hint to you (to late this year) is use sheep manure in you carrot garden. I have never ever tasted sweeter carrots than those grown in sheep manure by my father-in-law.
 

Trapper62

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I used electric fence post but when they got loaded with cucumbers I needed to put in T posts, so will start with them this year. The trellis is a 16' pencil rod panel for cattle.

If you want lots of carrots for over the winter, plant them in 5 gallon pails and put outside for the growing season, when temp get to freezing, carry the pails into the garage (if not heated) and when you want some just dump out a pail into a wheel barrow and your carrots will be almost like fresh picked.
 
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Petras

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I've seen people use a 55 gallon drum and layers of sand to get carrots to keep all winter.... my folks did it 1 year and it worked well.... just pour some sand in, put carrots in and make sure they are not touching each other, cover with more sand, put more carrots in etc.......
 


ItemB

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Great idea with the cucumbers Trapper;) Do the gardeners here use tomato cages or stakes or anything?
 

BDub

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I always use the heaviest cages you can buy. Menards has good ones. I normally raise my tomatoes with two plants in each pod. Thus two plants per support. I always end up bracing these up as they are heavy.
 

Bed Wetter

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Right now? Dirt. And my last wife. Ssssshhhhh! Our little secret...
 

raider

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garden planted today... peas, beans, potatoes, squash, cukes, zukes, tomatoes, and carrots... still have tons of corn from last year, and only 2 tomato plants cuz still have bout 120 quarts of salsa left from last year...

couple notes...

i built tomato cages 3 years ago out of 3/4" square tubing (sick of the store junk)... they are 18" x 18" square, and have cross members every 12" going up to a top height of 4', with 12" legs stuck in the ground... our tomatoes grow to bout 5' high with these cages, and will not tip over even in the strongest winds or storms... cost bout $40 each with paint and lots of cutting and welding, but should last for many many years...

we cut up big carrots in the fall for stew and soup... the small ones we clean and keep in the bottom of the fridge in unsealed ziplocks lined with paper towels... we are still eating baby carrots from last year...

k... garden is in... now can i fish???
 


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